Summaries – Oatmealvibes

  1. Paper or Plastic?

It seems counterintuitive that we cut down trees to make paper, just to take CO2 out of the environment. Trees are a renewable source so theoretically, using and recycling paper could stop climate change.

When we cut down a tree, another one can be replanted, making paper and trees a renewable source on our planet. Paper can hide considerable amounts of carbon dioxide due to photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is used by plants (trees in this case) to produce energy, releasing oxygen as a by-product. Paper can sequester carbon dioxide even after it’s been manufactured and distributed. This means as long as decomposition or burning of the paper has not happened, paper can hold a significant amount of carbon dioxide.

16.1 million tons of carbon was concealed last year from wood products which includes paper. That is 16.1 million less that would have been in the atmosphere. However, paper degrades quickly, only lasting 2-3 years to store carbon. Using wood for buildings or houses is a better wood storing carbon method as buildings last longer. Recycling would help isolate carbon in paper longer and with the method of selling our waste paper to China, they use our waste paper to ship products from China to the United States. Not only does this make money for the U.S. but it also helps save the planet by recycling more paper to sequester carbon dioxide from being released into the atmosphere.

Regardless, many still see paper as a reusable source to burn or to dispose of in landfills that then decompose into methane which is even more potent of a greenhouse gas than CO2. Using paper as a carbon sink in theory is doable but not very sustainable in the long-run.

2. Free Heroin to Battle Addiction

It seems counterintuitive that we give heroin to heroin addicts so that they’re less of a danger to themselves and others. We give them drugs in order for them to function more safely and efficiently.

“Downtown Eastside” which is a town in Vancouver has a drug (specifically heroin) problem. Vancouver has tried to stop the spread of the drug problem and recently came up with a safe zone called Insite. Insite allows heroin users to shoot up while being supervised by nurses and without the police arresting them. The staff provides antiseptic wipes and clean syringes while also giving them pure heroin. Only 26 current heroin addicts get the free heroin treatment prescribed by a doctor as other treatment methods have not worked for them such as methadone. Insite isn’t to get heroin addicts clean, its for “harm reduction” so that they do not harm others such as breaking into someones car for money or harming themselves by shooting up with a dirty needle and laying dead in an alley with the needle stuck in their arm.

Many disagree with this method although it originated in European countries such as the Netherlands and Switzerland. They consider what Vancouver’s Insite is doing is black-mail. It tells the heroin addict that they’re so beyond help and incapable of getting clean that they will give into their addiction to prevent more harm from happening. We are killing them slowly, just in a more favorable way than just killing them quickly with a gun.

3) White Folks get Prozac

It seems counterintuitive that the healthcare system is providing prozac to predominantly white patients with depression while minorities are given cheaper and older anti-depressants for the same mental illness.

Prozac launched in 1987 with fewer side effects and exceptionally lower overdose chance than other anti-depressants on the market. Research conducted by the University of Michigan analyzed physicians prescribing patterns with their patients dealing with major depression. It was found that doctors were considerably more likely to prescribe prozac or newer medicine to white patients and people with private healthcare over minorities and those with medicare. Another study by Washington State University showed around 11% of white people were prescribed anti-depressants over 4% of blacks and Hispanics.

Why the huge difference in healthcare between whites and minorities has too many variables to 100% determine but racism on the doctor and health providers part seems prevalent. The healthcare system in general needs to change with many not having healthcare, and insurance providing inadequate healthcare when insured. Healthcare should be striving equitably for all patients and reforming the system to get everyone regardless of race and health insurance status proper treatment.

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5 Responses to Summaries – Oatmealvibes

  1. oatmealvibes says:

    I didn’t get the grade I was expecting with this assignment, what exactly could I have done better to get an A?

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    • oatmealvibes says:

      To be more specific, was there any grammar problems? Did I not write enough? Was my writing too informal? Anything that could help me improve when making summaries in general?

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      • davidbdale says:

        To be more specific, was there any grammar problems?
        —Yes.

        Did I not write enough?
        —That’s not an issue.

        Anything that could help me improve when making summaries in general?
        —Of course. Always! Let’s begin below. (Might take awhile. Be patient.)

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    • davidbdale says:

      I’m so glad you wanted better and are willing to seek Feedback to achieve it, OatmealVibes. If you have or can add the skills, I’ll work with you tirelessly. Your grade is already above average for all posts that earned a grade, but you want excellence. Hooray. Let’s get started.

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  2. davidbdale says:

    It seems counterintuitive that we cut down trees to make paper, just to take CO2 out of the environment. Trees are a renewable source so theoretically, using and recycling paper could stop climate change.
    Well, . . . we don’t cut down trees to take CO2 out of the environment. I don’t know how to react to that claim. Readers will be very puzzled. Recycling paper is certainly a good way to slow climate change, but most if it REPLACES cutting down more trees. Either way, planting and growing trees is a great idea.

    When we cut down a tree, another one can be replanted, making paper and trees a renewable source on our planet.
    Right. You’re on track here after an early detour. But we still don’t know what’s counterintuitive.

    Paper can hide considerable amounts of carbon dioxide due to photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is used by plants (trees in this case) to produce energy, releasing oxygen as a by-product. Paper can sequester carbon dioxide even after it’s been manufactured and distributed. This means as long as decomposition or burning of the paper has not happened, paper can hold a significant amount of carbon dioxide.
    The sequence here is really confusing, OV. Not sure we need much of this material to prove your point, but the conclusion is really valuable: As long as paper isn’t burned or decomposed, it still sequesters carbon. (The carbon stays sequestered through the recycling process, too.)

    16.1 million tons of carbon was concealed last year from wood products which includes paper. That is 16.1 million [FEWER TONS] in the atmosphere.

    However, paper degrades quickly, only lasting 2-3 years to store carbon. Using wood for buildings or houses is a better wood storing carbon method as buildings last longer.
    It’s responsible of you to want to include “both sides,” OV, but Purposeful Summary doesn’t benefit from it. And your claim is untrue. Libraries are full of books that have survived a century or more. My bookcases are full of books that have survived since I was in college. IN A LANDFILL, paper degrades quickly, but you’re recommending RECYCLING, not trashing, right? Skip this part.

    Recycling would help isolate carbon in paper longer and with the method of selling our waste paper to China, they use our waste paper to ship products from China to the United States. Not only does this make money for the U.S. but it also helps save the planet by recycling more paper to sequester carbon dioxide from being released into the atmosphere.
    Back on track after another detour.

    Regardless, many still see paper as a reusable source to burn or to dispose of in landfills that then decompose into methane which is even more potent of a greenhouse gas than CO2.
    VERY CONFUSING. “reusable source to burn”? “or dispose”? If you’re going to mention this at all, and clarify what it means, you should do so EARLY in your summary to give yourself time for refutation. But . . . what good does it do you?

    Using paper as a carbon sink in theory is doable but not very sustainable in the long-run.
    So. I’m lost. I think most readers will be. Planting trees good. Planting trees and leaving trees alone: best. Cutting down trees to build houses: pretty good. Cutting down trees to create paper: OK. Recycling paper: Best use of paper. Do you need all of these to make a Purposeful Summary? No.

    If I wanted an A for my Purposeful Summary:

    It seems counterintuitive that we cut down trees to make paper, when so much of the world’s paper could be recycled. Trees are a natural carbon sink, using photosynthesis to remove harmful carbon dioxide from the over-saturated atmosphere and replacing it with healthy oxygen. 16.1 million tons of carbon was sequestered last year from wood products that would otherwise have caused more global warming. Trees are also sustainable and renewable; we can plant them specifically for making paper and plant more to replace the ones we cut. Paper holds onto carbon as long as it’s intact, releasing it only when burned or when it decomposes in a landfill. Our best practice would be to recycle every scrap of existing paper into more paper.

    Want to try this on the other two yourself?
    Always Reply to feedback, please, OatmealVibes. It’s the primary benefit of this class, and I love the conversation, but I lose interest if it’s one-sided.

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