Claims-venom2929

22

With a half million disability cases stuck in a VA backlog, and an estimated 25 percent of Iraq/Afghanistan troops with PTSD not seeking treatment

The author uses a factual claim. It is a factual claim because it talks about the percentage of people who do not end up getting treatment.

They will hang in there until the last dog is dead

The author uses an Analogy Claim here. This makes a connection saying that military spouses will hang in there by their husbands side until they pass.

 And the vet who got fired from his job for being unstable and is now homeless, like 13,000 other vets under 30, who now lives with his wife and teenager in his car.

This is a Comparative Claim, the author uses this type of claim when comparing this vet to 13,000 others who are out of work and the same age group.

The whole point of FOV is trying to give people hope,” Brannan says. “Give people the tools to not give up.

This is a Casual Claim because it is stating that FOV will help give people hope and also give them the tools to help them have a better conscience and not give up.

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1 Response to Claims-venom2929

  1. davidbdale says:

    In every case, the claims you analyze are what you say they are, but they’re also much more than what you say they are, venom.

    With a half million disability cases stuck in a VA backlog, and an estimated 25 percent of Iraq/Afghanistan troops with PTSD not seeking treatment.

    —There’s a factual claim or two here, yes.
    —500,000 disability cases are not being processed swiftly
    —25% of traumatized troops are not seeking treatment

    But it’s also Evaluative and Ethical

    “stuck in a VA backlog” is only factual if there’s consensus that it’s unusual or objectionable for 500,000 claims to be needlessly or egregiously delayed. If 100 MILLION taxpayers file their taxes on the same day, do we describe the situation the next day as “100 Million tax returns are stuck in an IRS backlog”? We don’t, because nobody could expect the Service to process 100 million returns in a day. But the author of the sentence you cite clearly believes there’s a SERIOUS PROBLEM at the VA that it is failing to process the cases of 500,000 veterans in timely fashion. That’s an evaluation and the conclusion it suggests is a moral or ethical objection to the MISTREATMENT by FAILURE to TREAT half a million disable soldiers.

    The second part of the sentence is even more complex.

    an estimated 25 percent of Iraq/Afghanistan troops with PTSD not seeking treatment.

    —It claims to know how many I/A vets suffer PTSD
    —It further claims to know how many are receiving treatment, how many are seeking but might not be receiving treatment, and how many are not even seeking treatment.
    —It’s unclear what the author thinks might be the cause of the failure to seek treatment, but . . .

    . . . together with the previous complaint about the inexcusable backlog of cases, PERSONALLY I DRAW THE CONCLUSION that the author thinks the backlog in processing disability claims IS DISCOURAGING PTSD sufferers from even bothering to seek the treatment they know they need out of frustration that they won’t get help from the VA.

    Does that help?

    Like

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