Research – Frogs02

Obesity Ruins The World

The term “obesity” is overly misrepresented by society. The usual thought when
hearing obesity is overweight. What is not recognized is the health problems that follow
obesity. Obesity can cause heart problems and can lead to cancer and sometimes
death. Throughout society, obesity is judgmental, but it can be solved with the use of
activity rather than judgments. Research is extremely important in stopping the
unhealthy habits that lead to obesity. Obesity is taken more seriously by medical
Professionals compared to others. Society continues to judge and make fun of what
they do not know. Obesity is a diverse disease and is different for each person. There
are specific differences surrounding obesity in men and women. These differences
include the probability of getting it, body mass, survivability, and lifestyle. 
Obesity is not the only cause of cancer and intake of food and lack of exercise is
not the only cause of obesity. It would be incorrect to blame caloric intake for all or
even most cancers. It is difficult to assess how much obesity can contribute to cancer.
For example, the evidence shows that physical activity can prevent cancers, mostly
colon cancer for men, and breast cancer for women, even more obviously for
postmenopausal women. We cannot blame obesity for the risk of getting cancer. It is
not the only cause of cancer.

Obesity in women and men has different effects on the body. Men are more
likely to be active than women. Heart disease and weight loss are closely linked
because the risk for heart disease is associated with a person’s weight. Men are more
likely to recognize that being overweight causes health problems and are not distracted
they look. Men have twice the percentage of muscle mass as women. This makes them
heavier. In the Global Gender Disparities article, Kanter states that “the nutrition transition taking place in many developing countries has also affected excess weight gain among both genders but has had an even greater impact on the physical activity levels of women.” Men have a higher chance of getting
cancer while women are more likely to survive it. Men are 6% more likely to die from
any type of cancer than women. Men are 12% more likely to die from a certain type of
cancer than a woman with the same type of cancer. EHealth states that a recent study suggests that the
differences between the sexes may in part be due to carcinogenic exposures and
lifestyle factors like cigarette smoking, drinking alcohol, and eating fattier foods — all of
which are more prevalent among men.

Tobacco is the leading cause of cancer and next is obesity, the second most
common cause of cancer. Though they are the top two causes of cancer does not mean
that everyone who is obese and uses tobacco will get cancer. For example, in Tobacco
and Cancer
, an article written by the Cancer Council in Western Australia states that
“decades of research has proven smoking causes cancer, but this doesn’t mean every
person who smokes will get cancer and every person who doesn’t smoke will remain
cancer-free. Smokers are more likely to get cancer than non-smokers, and their risk of
many other negative health effects is also increased.” This is the same for obesity.
Noncancer events are playing a significant role as the cause of death among individuals
with specific cancers. In a previous study, the CDC identified that an increased risk of
death from non-cancer events among patients with cancer had longer survival, but data
on specific noncancer events were limited. 

Obesity could be a cause of death but that does not mean everyone who is
obese will die. For example, an NFL football player typically weighs 224.97 pounds.
That is considered obese in terms of BMI. However, they are active and in shape. Their
activity status outweighs their size and risks of cancer. Society views an obese person
as someone who is lazy, a person who unfortunately ate too much, and a person who
has hardly exercised. An NFL football player is obese, and society does not view them
as an embarrassment. In the last five years, only five out of 1,696 have been diagnosed
with cancer. Two out of the five were not considered obese and the other three were
considered obese. There is no evidence that obesity caused these cancers but there
also is no evidence that obesity did not cause these cancers.

Cancer can develop due to previous health conditions but that is not always the
case. Society would view almost any athlete as healthy. If this is the case, then why
have 10 Olympic Athletes developed cancer. Very Well Health stated that “gold medal-
winning gymnast Shannon Miller was diagnosed with an ovarian germ cell tumor after
healthcare providers discovered a baseball-sized cyst on her ovary.” She had no
previous health conditions and still developed cancer. Studies have shown that obesity
can cause cancer. Obesity is a health condition. In the Irish Times article, Why Obesity
is Not a Choice
, studies have shown that Europe has been “recently criticized for having
the lowest EU level of public treatment for obesity, the cost of treating obesity-related
diseases in Ireland is significant. It is estimated to reach an annual cost of €2.1 billion in
five years, according to The Irish Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, as the
links between obesity and heart disease, mental ill-health, cancers, respiratory
problems, type 2 diabetes, and musculoskeletal conditions are well established. More
than a million of us are living with a treatable disease.” The psychological perspective of
this statement is to address the policy and to practice and research the priorities.

The way society views how someone gets obese is mistaken most of the time
and controversial. Most of society views it as an effect of a person’s life decisions.
Although too much food and laziness could make anyone obese, just being born can
easily make someone obese as well. Obesity can run through genes. Obesity is hard to
turn around. Once someone gets past the point of obesity, they are usually stuck.
Cancer has many causes other than obesity. Being obese can cause cancer and trying
to reverse obesity can also cause cancer. Researchers discovered that weight loss pills
will increase the risk of cancer. Obesity can be caused by hereditary genes, exposure
to radiation, improper sleep, or care of the body. Many cases of radiation cancers and
unidentified crises in the world. For example, in Kyiv Oblast, Ukraine, where the
Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded and caused mass radiation across the city.
This caused many to get cancer and till this day, that same radiation is in the ground. A
group of expert psychologists states that obesity is a complex problem that needs an
understanding of the factors that can lie beneath the condition. The psychological
impact of weight gain can determine whether treatment will be a success or failure.

Studies have shown that with improved cancer survivorship, cardiovascular
disease (CVD) and other noncancer events compete with cancer as the underlying
cause of death, but the risks of mortality in competing-risk settings have not been well
characterized. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a group of conditions that involve the heart and blood vessels. Common complications include heart attack, chest pain
(angina), or stroke. The number of individuals living with a history of cancer has
continued to increase. CVD deaths are varied by first cancer site, indicating increased
risks after the first diagnosis of lung cancer, hematologic malignancy, and urinary tract
cancer. For individuals with all cancers combined, CVD was the leading cause of
competing mortality in both male and female patients with cancer. CVD can be caused
by obesity. Men are more likely to be more active than women. If a person is overweight
or obese, they may be at higher risk for the condition. Medical experts consider obesity
to be a major risk factor for both coronary heart disease and heart attack.

This article, Social and Environmental Factors Influencing Obesity, published by
NCBI states that “the extent of the information on individual, environmental, and social
hierarchy constraints on obesity development, it is important to understand how these
can merge with clinical care. It is evident that no one simple solution and effective care
requires knowledge of these complex relationships and integration between the health
system and the surrounding community.” The evidence for social and environmental
factors that contribute to obesity is often underappreciated. Obesity prevalence is
significantly associated with sex, racial-ethnic identity, and socioeconomic status, which
creates complex relationships between each of these characteristics. Food availability
remains a crucial factor of obesity and it relates to differences in prevalence seen
across areas and higher rates of obesity within low socioeconomic status individuals.

Fat people need loving and understanding too! Not every single fat person is
obese or has an eating disorder. It is possible their dietary habits and inactivity
contribute to their obesity, but it is certain that conditions beyond their control also
contribute to them storing excess body fat. Obesity is not just an appearance. It is a
medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to an extent that it may
have a negative effect on health. Obesity is a metabolic condition—a result of the
complex processes by which the body converts food into energy—it can also be
influenced by chemicals in the environment (over which we have limited control) and
genetics (over which we have no control). We cannot blame ourselves for the things we
cannot control such as the way we look and what our bodies do to us. 

In the last century, researchers have recognized a rapid increase in obesity
cases. Obesity accounts for 20% of all cancer cases. This does not mean that the other
80% of cancer cases cannot be obese, it means other health conditions contributed to
this cancer case. Evidence is showing the benefits of physical activity for breast and
colon cancers. The growing epidemic of obesity provides a challenge to clinical practice
and the implementation of guidelines for the management of weight. Obesity is one of
the top leading causes of cancer. According to the world health organization, obesity
has nearly tripled since 1975. In the U.S. 42% of adults were considered obese (2017-
2018). For individuals with all cancers combined, CVD was the leading cause of
competing mortality in both male and female patients with cancer. CVD can be caused
by obesity. Men are more likely to be more active than women. If someone is overweight or
obese, then they at a higher risk for the condition.

Physical activity, body size, and metabolic efficiency are related to total energy
intake. It is difficult to assess the independent effect of energy intake on cancer risk.
There are sufficient pieces of evidence to support the role of physical activity in preventing cancers of the colon and breast. The association is stronger in men than in
women for colon cancer and in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women for
breast cancer. While obesity can be looked upon on the internet for an exact definition,
society has its own reflection on obesity and so does the medical field. 
Many humans who are not medical care workers will define obesity as “fat
people” or “overweight people” and while that may be the case, it can be argued.
Overweight people can be narrowed down to people who do not exercise, people who
eat poorly, and genetics that gives overweight people the unfortunate disadvantage of
being prone to certain diseases. Ask anyone what obesity means and they will narrow it
down to those three factors. Society is judgmental. Society’s first instinct is to judge
someone who is obese. The unhealthy habits of not exercising and eating healthy
need to stop. Those are things that can stop. While society is quick to judge someone
who is obese, medical care takes caution against obesity. 

Anyone in the medical field can say that when an obese person comes in, they
are ready for work. Obesity is one of the top causes of cancers in men and women.
However, it is more likely in women. Obesity is a complex disease that cannot be
minimized to the “calories in/calories out” mantra that has become commonplace.
Factors that can contribute to weight might include biological issues such as genetics
and hormonal changes that come with aging; developmental issues such as parental
obesity; psychological issues including depression or history of trauma; or
environmental factors, such as sizable portion sizes. These are just a few of the many
possible contributors.

Many people will agree that most of the time, being overweight is all the person’s
fault, which in some cases is true. Society is so judgmental of people’s weight that
there are stigmas and set opinions. Society has an obesity stigma which is: people with obesity is widespread and cause harm. Weight stigma is often propagated and tolerated in society because of beliefs that stigma and shame will motivate people to lose weight.  This stigma contributes to behaviors such as binge eating, social isolation, avoidance of health care services, decreased physical activity,
and increased weight gain, which worsens obesity and creates additional barriers to
healthy behavior change. So, while the medical field is influencing obesity to stop and
give tips, society is ruining those chances of demolishing obesity. 

Overall, obesity can be argued. Society will make it seem like it is just a little bit
of weight while the medical field will take control. The stigma needs to stop. Obesity can
cause more than a change in appearance. It can cause more health issues than people
imagine. Obesity needs to be treated and the person needs to be helped. Obesity is
taken more seriously by medical professionals and dieticians and is judged more by
society. The quicker that society realizes the health crisis of obesity and they take it
seriously, the faster we drop the percentage of obese people. Obesity can cause cancer
if it is not taken care of in time.

Humans that are obese are prone to have negative health effects for most of
their life. Those health effects can be cardiovascular issues, cancer, bone issues, etc.
There is no limit to the amount of illness and severe medical issues that obesity can
cause. Not being able to stay active and being under the body mass index can cause
cancer. The differences between the sexes may in part be due to carcinogenic
exposures and lifestyle factors like cigarette smoking, drinking alcohol, and eating fattier foods — all of which are more prevalent among men.

After researching obesity, the hypothesis that obesity and negative health effects
have been one of the top three reasons for humans getting cancer is the top study
listed. This study covers that weight, weight gain, and obesity account for approximately
20% of all cancer cases. Data from the past 25 years point to obesity as a cause of
approximately 14% of cancer deaths in men and up to 20% of cancer deaths in women.
Overweightness and obesity have increased from 15% in 1980 to 35% in 2005. The
researchers for the International Agency for Research on Cancer studied and tested the
rates of obesity in many of the common cancers. Researchers concluded that obesity
was a cause of 11% of colon cancer cases, 9% of postmenopausal breast cancer
cases, 39% of endometrial cancer cases, 25% of kidney cancer cases, and 37% of
esophageal cancer cases. 
 
 Since the 2002 IARC report, new evidence has supported a cause-and-effect
relation between overweight and obesity and the start of these cancers, increasing the
responsibility of cancer resulting from obesity. Physical activity, body size, and
metabolic efficiency are related to total energy intake. It is difficult to assess the
independent effect of energy intake on cancer risk. There are sufficient pieces of
evidence to support the role of physical activity in preventing cancers of the colon and
breast. Epidemiology is the study and analysis of the distribution, patterns, and
determinants of health and disease conditions in defined populations. Epidemiologic
evidence indicates that obesity is probably related to cancers of the pancreas, liver, and
gallbladder, and aggressive prostate cancer. The body mass index can determine
whether someone is obese or not. Body mass index is a value derived from the mass and
height of a person. The body mass index is used as a screening tool for overweight and
obesity. Being overweight and obese can cause changes in the body that help lead to
cancer. Some of these changes are long-lasting inflammation and higher than normal
levels of insulin, insulin-like growth factor, and sex hormones. The risk of cancer
increases with the more excess weight a person gains and the longer a person is
overweight. 


Studies have shown that with improved cancer survivorship, cardiovascular
disease (CVD) and other noncancer events compete with cancer as the underlying
cause of death, but the risks of mortality in competing-risk settings have not been well
characterized. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a group of conditions that involve the
heart and blood vessels. CVD deaths are varied by first cancer site, indicating increased
risks after the first diagnosis of lung cancer, hematologic malignancy, and urinary tract
cancer. For individuals with all cancers combined, CVD was the leading cause of
competing mortality in both male and female patients with cancer. CVD can be caused
by obesity. Men are more likely to be more active than women.

Obesity is one of the leading factors in cancer. What we do with our body, what
we put in our body, what we do in a day are all leading causes of cancer. Obesity has
different effects in men and women, children and adults, and healthy and unhealthy
people. The different causes for each person have a different effect on how long and
how healthy a person can live. Obesity is dangerous but it is usually avoidable and can
be maintained if help is reached before it is too late. Unhealthy habits need to be
stopped before they reach this level.

References

Walsh, Geraldine. “Why Obesity Is Not a Choice.” The Irish Times, The Irish Times, 4 Dec. 2019, https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/health-family/why-obesity-is-not-a-choice-1.4095580. 

Lee, Alexandra. “Social and Environmental Factors Influencing Obesity.” Endotext [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 12 Oct. 2019, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK278977/. 

2015-05-08-DL-TOBACCO-and-CANCER.pdf – \U201CI only smoke socially am I still at risk?\u201d how do we know information in this brochure is from the following: Course hero. 2015-05-08-DL-TOBACCO-and-CANCER.pdf – \u201cI only smoke socially am I still at risk?\u201d How do we know Information in this brochure is from the following | Course Hero. (n.d.). Retrieved November 30, 2021, from https://www.coursehero.com/file/67073359/2015-05-08-DL-TOBACCO-and-CANCERpdf/.

How cancer affects men and women differently. (n.d.). http://Www.eehealth.orghttps://www.eehealth.org/blog/2017/11/how-cancer-affects-men-and-women-differently/

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/obesity/index.htm

Obesity and Cancer | CDC. (2021, March 10). http://Www.cdc.govhttps://www.cdc.gov/cancer/obesity/index.htm

Pan, S. Y., & DesMeules, M. (2009). Energy intake, physical activity, energy balance, and cancer: epidemiologic evidence. Methods in Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.), 472, 191–215. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60327-492-0_8

Pont, S. J., Puhl, R., Cook, S. R., & Slusser, W. (2017). Stigma Experienced by Children and Adolescents With Obesity. Pediatrics140(6), e20173034. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-3034

Tsang, N. M., Pai, P. C., Chuang, C. C., Chuang, W. C., Tseng, C. K., Chang, K. P., Yen, T. C., Lin, J. D., & Chang, J. T. C. (2016). Overweight and obesity predict better overall survival rates in cancer patients with distant metastases. Cancer Medicine, 5(4), 665–675. https://doi.org/10.1002/cam4.634

This entry was posted in Feedback Please, frogs, Graded Portfolio Frogs, Research FA21. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Research – Frogs02

  1. davidbdale says:

    If you want to rise to the top of the Feedback Please queue, Frogs, drop me a specific Reply here describing the sort of feedback that would help you the most. Is it your Argument, your Sources, your Research technique, your Logic, your Rhetoric, your Organization, your Grammar, or something else that you’d prefer to have help with?

    Like

  2. frogs02 says:

    i want feedback on my argument and organization

    Like

  3. davidbdale says:

    I was noticing a lot of YOU language, Frogs. (You remember we banned the 2nd person completely?) https://compclass2021.com/2021/11/23/enough-about-you-frogs02/

    I did a search for you, on your entire essay, and THAT’s when something more surprising showed up. The reason I saw so much YOU language is that you repeated the same sentence 5 TIMES, each time with its four mentions of the 2nd person, THREE TIMES followed by the same sentence about “Medical experts.” Here they are:

    1. Heart disease and weight loss are closely linked because your risk for heart disease is associated with your weight.

    2. Heart disease and weight loss are closely linked. Your risk for heart disease is associated with your weight. If you are overweight or obese, you may be at higher risk for the condition. Medical experts consider obesity to be major risk factors for both coronary heart disease and heart attack.

    3. Heart disease and weight loss are closely linked because your risk for heart disease is associated with your weight. If you are overweight or obese, you may be at higher risk for the condition. Medical experts consider obesity and being overweight to be major risk factors for both coronary heart disease and heart attack.

    4. Heart disease and weight loss are closely linked because your risk for heart disease is associated with your weight. If you are overweight or obese, you may be at higher risk for the condition.

    5. Heart disease and weight loss are closely linked because your risk for heart disease is associated with your weight. If you are overweight or obese, you may be at higher risk for the condition. Medical experts consider obesity and being overweight to be major risk factors for both coronary heart disease and heart attack.

    Bad habits need to be stopped before they reach this level and you can not undo it.

    I haven’t done a more thorough search, but before I do, you might drop me a note here to ask me to delay that exercise. Is there a lot more repeated material?

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s