APA Citation

Informal In-text APA Citation

In an article at the Center for Disease Control’s website called “Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences,” the CDC issues the warning that a primary cause of excess weight gain in children is “eating high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and beverages” such as sugary drinks. Most people hearing the term “sugary drinks” think of soda exclusively; however, the category is much broader. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.” In an attempt to alert us to the prevalence of sugar in commercial beverages, the Journal of Public Health Dentistry has compiled a list of what it considers sugary drinks, adding sweetened teas to the category. And finally, in the “Advice for Patients” section of the journal Nutrients, examples can be found of several sugary drink types including fruitades such as Gatorade and lemonade, fruit-flavored drinks like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, sodas such as Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and energy drinks like Monster or Red Bull. These drinks are found in most American homes and often considered healthy. But Jennifer Pomeranz in the Journal of Public Health Policy warns that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in most children’s diet and also their main source of calorie intake. When children drink soda, Pomeranz continued, they take in more calories than they can immediately use, and the unspent calories get converted into fat.

References

Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences. (2016, December 15). Retrieved April 16, 2018, from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/causes.html

Keast, D., Fulgoni, V., Nicklas, T., & O’Neil, C. (2013). Food Sources of Energy and Nutrients among Children in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2006. Nutrients5(1), 283–301. MDPI AG. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu5010283

Mallonee, L. F., Boyd, L. D., & Stegeman, C. (2017). A scoping review of skills and tools oral health professionals need to engage children and parents in dietary changes to prevent childhood obesity and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 77. doi:10.1111/jphd.12237

Ogden, Cynthia L., et al. Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005-2008. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Pomeranz, J. L., Munsell, C. R., & Harris, J. L. (2013). Energy drinks: An emerging public health hazard for youth. Journal of Public Health Policy, 34(2), 254-271. doi:10.1057/jphp.2013.6

I see the model. Now, how does it work?

When the author of this argument about sugary drinks makes a reference to an academic journal, website, or magazine article in her essay, she quotes or paraphrases the article’s content and provides enough details in the text to help readers find the source in the References list.

Example 1 (Publisher and Title, plus Quote):

In an article at the Center for Disease Control’s website called “Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences,“ the CDC issues the warning that a primary cause of excess weight gain in children is “eating high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and beverages” such as sugary drinks.

Example 2 (Publisher plus quote):

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.”

Example 3 (Name of Journal, plus Paraphrase):

In an attempt to alert us to the prevalence of sugar in commercial beverages, the Journal of Public Health Dentistry has compiled a list of what it considers sugary drinks, adding sweetened teas to the category.

Example 4 (Name of Journal, Title of Article, plus Paraphrase):

And finally, in the “Advice for Patients” section of the journal Nutrients, examples can be found of several sugary drink types including fruitades such as Gatorade and lemonade, fruit-flavored drinks like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, sodas such as Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and energy drinks like Monster or Red Bull.

Example 5 (Author, Name of Journal, plus Paraphrase):

But Jennifer Pomeranz in the Journal of Public Health Policy warns that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in most children’s diet and also their main source of calorie intake. When children drink soda, they take in more calories than they can immediately use, and the unspent calories get converted into fat.


Exercise

YOUR TURN TO CREATE IN-TEXT CITATION:
In a Reply below, read the paragraph below, excerpted from a recent article in the New York Times.

  • Create a brief statement about the book review.
  • Name both the Title of the book and the Title of the review.
  • Name both the Author of the book and the Author of the review.
  • Quote or paraphrase both the Author of the book and the Author of the review.
  • Use natural language and the in-text citation technique to provide the bibliographic information a reader would need to trace your source.
  • Decide for yourself what bibliographic information is essential.
  • Decide for yourself whether paraphrase, or direct quotation, or a combination is the best way to deliver the author’s meaning.

Jacob Goldstein is a host of NPR’s “Planet Money.” His new book features the show’s trademark storytelling: fast-paced and chatty.
Jacob Goldstein is a host of NPR’s “Planet Money.” His new book features the show’s trademark storytelling: fast-paced and chatty.

By Richard Davies
Sep. 8, 2020
Book ReviewMoney: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing by Jacob Goldstein

Of all the inventions we rely on to get through the day, nothing is as strange as money. Currency is a national bedrock that sits alongside anthems and flags; our cash — from pristine $100 bills to dog-eared 5 pound notes — seems solid, official and enduring. At the same time money is a confidence trick: an IOU printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money. The evolving paradox of modern currency — foundational yet resting on faith — is the central theme of Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, a sweeping new history by Jacob Goldstein.

The main thread is set out right away: Money “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships,” Goldstein asserts. But it’s really “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” The early chronicles of cash show how societies move from monies with intrinsic value (commodity currencies, like salt, or coins made from precious metal) to paper currencies that are valuable because they are tools — ways to exchange goods and services.

18 Responses to APA Citation

  1. zzbrd2822 says:

    It seems as if today’s world and its interactions are run solely on money. According to Richard Davies in a book review called “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” money is nothing more than an i.o.u. or a confidence trick. The act of exchanging money is simply a promise of more paper money for the holder. In the book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing by Jacob Goldstein, money “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships”. It is a straightforward process that is not a common human construct in society.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. pitandthependulum22 says:

    In today’s society, one would think that money is a stable and non-confusing concept. That, however, may not be the case. Richard Davies, in his review “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round” states that “…money is a confidence trick. An IOU printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” Jacob Goldstein, author of Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing ( note: this should be italicized but my computer wouldn’t let me), communicates that money is “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” From the perspectives of Davies and Goldstein, money is simply a flimsy construct created for social purposes.

    Like

  3. rowanluver29 says:

    “Money is a confidence trick”. In the book review “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round” by Richard Davies, Davies discusses the Jacob Goldstein book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing. One of the first things he mentions is that money is nothing but a confidence trick that is simply “IOU printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” From Davies review, we quickly learn that Goldstein’s book discusses how money is a shared fiction, and strictly a way to exchange goods and services.

    Like

  4. Money seems to be a big foundation for things in this world. We rely on money all the time. Money is sometimes a big way that us humans can form relationships when we do things. According to Richard Davie’s book review called “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” money can be described as a “shared fiction,” and “money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” A lot of times, money can be a confidence trick that promises the holder nothing but more money, according to Jacob Goldstein’s book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing.

    Like

  5. gracchusbabeuf says:

    The distinction between fact and fiction is often blurred. Money, intriguingly, is described by writer Richard Davies as “The Fiction that makes the world go round” in his book review of Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing. The book, by author and host of NPR’s “Planet Money” program Jacob Goldstein, explores the paradoxical nature and history of money.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. girlno3 says:

    In our society today, some may think that money is a stable concept. This may not be the case. Richard Davies, in his review “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round” claims that “…money is a confidence trick. An IOU printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” Jacob Goldstein, author of Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, states that money is “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” From the perspectives of Davies and Goldstein, money is a cheap, made up object to take the place of physical goods.

    Like

  7. sunflower0311 says:

    Most people do not think of the fact that money truly is a made-up concept. A book review by Richard Davies entitled “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round” talks about the book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing by Jacob Goldstein. According to Richard Davies “money is a confidence trick: an IOU printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” To back it up Jacob Goldstein says that money is “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.”

    Like

  8. sortableelms says:

    Many people in today’s society feel that money is the greatest thing and that it is what makes the world go around in today’s world. Richard Davies explains his view on money in his book review “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round.” Davies believes that money is just as useful as an IOU on a simple piece of paper. Jacob Goldstein explains in his book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing that money “seems cold and mathematical.” It is a very straightforward way of thinking.

    Like

  9. pinkheart84 says:

    People depend on money and may think that it is the most important thing. Richard Davies’ book review, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” states that “Of all the inventions we rely on to get through the day, nothing is as strange as money.” Money has become a big foundation in people’s lives. In the book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing by Jacob Goldstein, explains that “money seems cold.” Most interactions have to do with money and people will continue to rely on it.

    Like

  10. g00dsoup says:

    The majority of individuals in today’s society believe that money is the best thing and that it is what sustains modern civilization. Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing  by Jacob Goldstein is discussed in Richard Davies’ book review, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round.” Davies believes that “…money is a confidence trick: an IOU printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” Goldstein argues that money is “a made-up thing, a shared fiction” to support his claim. 

    Like

  11. saycheese03 says:

    It’s an interesting thought that money is really just an object with a value placed on it. Richard Davies, the author of the book review, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” implies that money is an object with a value placed on it to make us feel better about ourselves. money is no more than a document that records the existence of value or debt. in the book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing by Jacob Goldstein, he states a made-up thing, is a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.”

    Like

  12. fulcrum66 says:

    The concept of money is only an idea and yet we consider it valuable. In regard to the book review, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” the author Richard Davies states, “An IOU printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” In the book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, author Jacob Goldstien tells, ” Seems cold and mathematical and outside the real realm of fuzzy human relationships.”

    Like

  13. chickennugget246 says:

    Money seems to have been created in society to be valuable, but in essence, it technically is an idea and actually may not be of any value. According to Richard Davies’ book review titled “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” he suggests that money is “an IOU printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” Davies is stating his idea and belief that money is made up and a concept learned by society. In addition to this belief and according to Jacob Goldstein’s book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, Goldstein offers that money is “a made-up thing, a shared fiction.” Similarly, these authors feel that money is a concept and a non-valuable object that we, as a society, have grown accustomed to over the years.

    Like

  14. inspireangels says:

    In this excerpt from the article “The Fiction that Makes the World Go Round,” by Richard Davis, he discusses the concept of money after reviewing the book Money: The True Story of Made Thing by the author Jacob Goldstein. Davis references money as something strange since it’s a “cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” This modern currency is something we rely on every day. This leads to the theme of Goldstein’s book where he indicates this whole money currency that we have invented is “a shared fiction.”

    Like

  15. Despite currency being the foundation of our modern society, money is worthless. Jacob Goldstein, the author of “Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing,” states that money is simply a piece of paper that promises future fortune. Richard Davies, the author of “The Fiction that Makes the World Go Round,” states that “The early chronicles of cash show how societies move from monies with intrinsic value (commodity currencies, like salt, or coins made from precious metal) to paper currencies that are valuable because they are tools — ways to exchange goods and services.” Money is virtually meaningless, however it is the worth that society puts on this paper that gives it weight.

    Like

  16. Shazammm says:

    The widely held belief about money is that it is a cruel subject that merely belongs in the business world. Society additionally views money as a valuable material that is real to us as it is tangible. In the brief excerpt from The New York Times book review, “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” by Richard Davies, Davies discusses Jacob Goldstein’s counterintuitive book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing. According to Goldstein, money is “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” And not only is it an illusion and communal object, but it also has an extensive history of changes that show, in the words of Davies, “how societies move from monies with intrinsic value (commodity currencies, like salt, or coins made from precious metal) to paper currencies.” In short, Goldstein’s book defies our perception of money through social and historical facts.

    Like

    • Shazammm says:

      Correction: Society additionally views money as valuable material that is real as life itself.

      Correction: And not only is it a shared illusion among social settings, but it also has an extensive history of changes…

      Like

  17. oatmealvibes says:

    Money in society seems to have always been a social construct. In “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” Richard Davies the author uses a quote from Jacob Goldstein’s book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing. It states that money is really “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” Money is used as an illusion and confidence trick that holds no actual value besides what society puts onto it. We the people put the worth onto money when it’s nothing but green paper. As Davies likes to refer to it, It’s “an IOU printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.”

    Like

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