Summaries – Kilotoon

Men Defining Rape: A History

It seems counterintuitive that men have been the deciding party for the everchanging definition of rape over the last many centuries. A factor that definitely contributes to my counterintuitive point of view of this topic is how men are rarely the victim yet historically make the calls as to what classifies as rape and what decides if a victim was truthful in court.

In the early 1200s, there was a law installed that excused a rapist from criminal charges if the victim was impregnated from the rape. This was backed up by the widespread thought process at the time that made it seem as if women could not become pregnant if the intercourse wasn’t consensual.

It was as recent at the 1990s that in certain states, statutory rape was not considered rape if the victim was ‘impure’. Even North Carolina legalized the rape of your spouse until 1993, as marriage apparently meant consent to sex at all times until then.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, men continuously argued over how much proof a woman needed to show to prove she was raped. Some argued that a semen test was needed, while others argued that proof should be needed to show the hymen was broken. Up until a certain point, men declared rape of black women to not even be considered a cause for prosecution.

Nonetheless, it is clear that men taking the leadership role in declaring the definition for rape is far from optimal and fair.

It seems counterintuitive that the daily multivitamins taken by about a third of Americans are made to be perceived as the medication for all illnesses.

Multivitamins that are to be taken daily are for people who do not get their nutrients in independently, such as from eating kale with their breakfast for example. Having a gummy multivitamin in the morning is and was never meant to independently cure potential heart disease, lung cancer, breast cancer, and colon cancer. To think so would be nothing but ignorant and oblivious.

Multivitamins are to boost the heath and increase potential benefits for people with a healthy lifestyle, not as a substitute for it.

It seems as if the average person with the classic American lifestyle and diet believe taking a multivitamin in the morning excuses them from leading a healthy lifestyle, when it is clearly not the case.

https://www.propublica.org/article/how-moms-death-changed-my-thinking-about-end-of-life-care

It seems counterintuitive that end-of-life care costs is considered an issue amongst many. It is a statistic that most end-of-life costs are made within a year of the patient’s death, and it hogs about a quarter of all Medicare payments. However, this conversation is easily biased depending on who you speak to about this issue. It is most definitely smarter to allocate that money to an issue that will benefit more people with a larger projected lifespan from the time the money is spent, although it is to be understood that it is much easier to declare such a statement when it isn’t your own loved one on the hospital bed. When it is your own mother at the mercy of the doctors and potential cures and procedures, money is and should never be even a topic to consider in that situation.

It’s clear that anybody who states money is something to consider when attempting to bash end-of-life care does not put themselves in the shoes of the loved ones who have to hope and pray that their loved ones don’t pass away at any given moment in front of them.

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2 Responses to Summaries – Kilotoon

  1. davidbdale says:

    It seems counterintuitive that end-of-life care costs is considered an issue amongst many. It is a statistic that most end-of-life costs are made within a year of the patient’s death, and it hogs about a quarter of all Medicare payments. However, this conversation is easily biased depending on who you speak to about this issue.

    Let me help you with this paragraph, Kilotoon.
    —End-of-life care costs can’t be counterintuitive.
    —That end-of-life care costs might be “an issue” can’t be counterintuitive.
    —For something to be counterintuitive (or reasonable, or obvious), it has to be a situation that seems likely but turns out not to be.
    —Being “an issue” doesn’t have enough personality to be either likely OR unlikely.
    —You name two facts that might lead people to believe that end-of-life costs are outrageous, or that they’re badly misspent, or that they must be fraudulent. Any of those would be a setup that could lead to counterintuitivity. But you don’t make any of those clear claims. Only that they’re “an issue.”
    —Therefore, your observation that “this conversation is biased” has no meaning.

    What I think you mean is:

    It seems counterintuitive that outsiders should object to money spent on end-of-life care costs when their loved ones are not the ones suffering or at risk of dying. While it is true that most end-of-life costs are made within a year of the patient’s death, and that it hogs about a quarter of all Medicare payments, those costs only seem unreasonable to people who aren’t involved.

    I hope that will help you see the difference between direct clear claims and vague assertions. Be VERY WARY of phrases like “considered an issue,” “this conversation,” and “this issue” without first being crystal about the nature of the issue and conversation.

    You may revise this post or not depending on how much time you’re willing to spend on a minor assignment, but I do expect you to respond to feedback to show your respect for the process. Thanks!

    Like

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