APA Citation

In-text APA Citation

In an article at the Center for Disease Control’s website called “Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences,” the CDC issues the warning that a primary cause of excess weight gain in children is “eating high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and beverages” such as sugary drinks. Most people hearing the term “sugary drinks” think of soda exclusively; however, the category is much broader. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.” In an attempt to alert us to the prevalence of sugar in commercial beverages, the Journal of Public Health Dentistry has compiled a list of what it considers sugary drinks, adding sweetened teas to the category. And finally, in the “Advice for Patients” section of the journal Nutrients, examples can be found of several sugary drink types including fruitades such as Gatorade and lemonade, fruit-flavored drinks like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, sodas such as Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and energy drinks like Monster or Red Bull. These drinks are found in most American homes and often considered healthy. But Jennifer Pomeranz in the Journal of Public Health Policy warns that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in most children’s diet and also their main source of calorie intake. When children drink soda, Pomeranz continued, they take in more calories than they can immediately use, and the unspent calories get converted into fat.

References

Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences. (2016, December 15). Retrieved April 16, 2018, from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/causes.html

Keast, D., Fulgoni, V., Nicklas, T., & O’Neil, C. (2013). Food Sources of Energy and Nutrients among Children in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2006. Nutrients5(1), 283–301. MDPI AG. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu5010283

Mallonee, L. F., Boyd, L. D., & Stegeman, C. (2017). A scoping review of skills and tools oral health professionals need to engage children and parents in dietary changes to prevent childhood obesity and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 77. doi:10.1111/jphd.12237

Ogden, Cynthia L., et al. Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005-2008. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Pomeranz, J. L., Munsell, C. R., & Harris, J. L. (2013). Energy drinks: An emerging public health hazard for youth. Journal of Public Health Policy, 34(2), 254-271. doi:10.1057/jphp.2013.6

I see the model. Now, how does it work?

When the author of this argument about sugary drinks makes a reference to an academic journal, website, or magazine article in her essay, she quotes or paraphrases the article’s content and provides enough details in the text to help readers find the source in the References list.

Example 1 (Publisher and Title, plus Quote):

In an article at the Center for Disease Control’s website called “Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences,“ the CDC issues the warning that a primary cause of excess weight gain in children is “eating high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and beverages” such as sugary drinks.

Example 2 (Publisher plus quote):

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.”

Example 3 (Name of Journal, plus Paraphrase):

In an attempt to alert us to the prevalence of sugar in commercial beverages, the Journal of Public Health Dentistry has compiled a list of what it considers sugary drinks, adding sweetened teas to the category.

Example 4 (Name of Journal, Title of Article, plus Paraphrase):

And finally, in the “Advice for Patients” section of the journal Nutrients, examples can be found of several sugary drink types including fruitades such as Gatorade and lemonade, fruit-flavored drinks like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, sodas such as Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and energy drinks like Monster or Red Bull.

Example 5 (Author, Name of Journal, plus Paraphrase):

But Jennifer Pomeranz in the Journal of Public Health Policy warns that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in most children’s diet and also their main source of calorie intake. When children drink soda, they take in more calories than they can immediately use, and the unspent calories get converted into fat.


Exercise

YOUR TURN TO CREATE IN-TEXT CITATION:
In a Reply below, read the paragraph below, excerpted from a recent article in the New York Times.

  • Create a brief statement about something the author says.
  • Decide for yourself who the Author is.
    • Do you want to quote Jacob Goldstein, the author of the book?
    • Or do you want to quote Richard Davies, the author of the book review?
  • In creating your statement, use natural language and the in-text citation technique to provide the bibliographic information a reader would need to trace your source.
  • Decide for yourself what bibliographic information is essential.
  • Decide for yourself whether paraphrase, or direct quotation, or a combination is the best way to deliver the author’s meaning.

Jacob Goldstein is a host of NPR’s “Planet Money.” His new book features the show’s trademark storytelling: fast-paced and chatty.
Jacob Goldstein is a host of NPR’s “Planet Money.” His new book features the show’s trademark storytelling: fast-paced and chatty.

By Richard Davies
Sep. 8, 2020
Book ReviewMoney: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing by Jacob Goldstein

Of all the inventions we rely on to get through the day, nothing is as strange as money. Currency is a national bedrock that sits alongside anthems and flags; our cash — from pristine $100 bills to dog-eared 5 pound notes — seems solid, official and enduring. At the same time money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u. printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money. The evolving paradox of modern currency — foundational yet resting on faith — is the central theme of “Money,” a sweeping new history by Jacob Goldstein.

The main thread is set out right away: Money “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships,” Goldstein asserts. But it’s really “a made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” The early chronicles of cash show how societies move from monies with intrinsic value (commodity currencies, like salt, or coins made from precious metal) to paper currencies that are valuable because they are tools — ways to exchange goods and services.

35 Responses to APA Citation

  1. lokiofasgard24 says:

    Richard Davies writes a book review of Jacob Goldstein’s, Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, and expresses how “strange” he believes money is. He explains that money has an assuring feel even though it is just “an i.o.u. printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” Goldstein expresses how money is not a natural human construct. He also states that money is just a “social” ploy and won’t be changed.

    Like

  2. spaghettitacosforthesoul says:

    In the book The True Story of a Made-Up Thing , Goldstein highlights the most important topic in the begging, stating that money is a man-made tool that is cold within human relationships. It has no value to society and Ricard Davies points out that it is only a demonstration of a transfer between commodity currencies to paper ones to “to exchange goods and services”.

    Like

  3. ilovedunkinoverstarbucks says:

    Money, while it may seem essential to everyday like it is just something that was made up and now decides out entire lives such as if we can go to college, where we can go to college, if we need to get a job, where we can get a job, what clothes we can buy and who we can be friends with. A piece of paper or a coin decides this entire fate for us even though it is just a thought someone had to make up the idea of money. “A made-up thing, a shared fiction. Money is fundamentally, unalterably social,” says Jacob Goldstein in his book, Money: The True Story of a Made Up Thing.

    Like

  4. toastedflatbread22 says:

    Money is being viewed in a new light and some believe that it does nothing than provide a cheap gift that doesn’t mean much in the long run. One of the people who believes this is Jacob Goldstein, who claims in his book “Money” that money is not a true source of useful currency-it has a greedy grip on humans and controls society. Similarly, Richard Davies makes similar statements in his review of Goldstein’s novel. He believes that money “seems solid, official and enduring.” These bold views certainly change the way money is viewed and prompt humans to consider if it truly provides them with a fulfilling life.

    Like

  5. zzbrd2822 says:

    It seems as if today’s world and its interactions are run solely on money. According to Richard Davies in a book review called “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” money is nothing more than an i.o.u. or a confidence trick. The act of exchanging money is simply a promise of more paper money for the holder. In the book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing by Jacob Goldstein, money “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships”. It is a straightforward process that is not a common human construct in society.

    Like

  6. cocochanel715 says:

    In the article, “The Fiction That Makes the World go Round,” “currency is a national bedrock that sits aside anthems and flags.” Money is just a rectangular piece of paper that has different values on it but it somehow controls the way the world functions. The way Jacob Goldstein asserts that money “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships,” indicates that people can be so coldhearted and not care about a single thing when it comes to getting money. Throughout the years of society, the way people use their money has changed drastically, Richard Davies mentions that “the early chronicles of cash show how societies move from monies with intrinsic value to paper currencies that are valuable.”

    Like

  7. levixvice says:

    Richard Davies’ book review on Jacob Goldstein’s, Money: The true Story of a Made-Up Thing, has an understandable idea of how “At the same time money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u. Printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” that relates to how Jacob Goldstein sees money as nothing more than how Richard puts it as “paper currencies that are valuable because they are tools.” that doesn’t serve any purpose but to buy and sell goods and services within human society.

    Like

  8. littlecow24 says:

    According to Richard Davies, based off of Jacob Goldstein’s book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing , the earlier usage of cash displays how societies have moved from monies with more intrinsic value, such as salt or commodity currencies, to paper currencies that are highly valued because of how easy it is to exchange goods and services.

    Like

  9. kingofcamp says:

    “…Money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u. printed on cheap material…” says Richard Davies, author of the book review for Jacob Goldstein’s Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing . These paper promises hold no heavy value in our modern world. Money is simply a mask shadowing the meritless ideologies that govern our society. Given the review, Richard Davies perfectly summarizes what author Jacob Goldstein’s book stresses.

    Like

  10. friendoftacos says:

    Richard Davies writes a review of Jacob Goldstein’s book and says in his article The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round, that money is a strange concept. Money is a piece of paper that we give the value to. Davies goes on to say that “money is a confidence trick: an i.o.u printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing.”

    Like

  11. Lunaduna says:

    Richard Davies writes a review on Jacob Goldstein’s book called “Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing “, which mentions how money can be seen as a trick. “An I.O.U printed on cheap material.” An I.O.U describes a promise to receive more paper money, which seems condescending. An absurdity on the modern-day currency.

    Like

  12. Anonymousgirl116 says:

    Richard Davies writes a review on Jacob Goldstein’s book called, “The true story of a made-up thing”. Davies says, “cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money” Davies is explaining the irony between the worthless piece of paper that is made up of the bill itself. Money is an everyday currency used as a confidence trick and ruins relationships.

    Like

  13. Lunaduna says:

    Richard Davies writes a review on Jacob Goldstein’s book called “Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, “ which mentions how money can be seen as a trick. “An I.O.U printed on cheap material.” An I.O.U describes a promise to receive more paper money, which seems condescending. An absurdity on the modern-day currency.

    Like

  14. gingerbreadman27 says:

    In the book review “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” Richard Davies asserts that money is nothing more than a “confidence trick: an i.o.u. printed on cheap material” that holds no value outside of modern society, yet is the foundation for the society we live in and a tool that facilitates trade. Paper money has no inherent value and only has value on the basis that goods and services will be received in exchange for it.

    Like

  15. minutemen14 says:

    The most valuable asset of money is merely a promise of value rather than an actual item of worth. In fact, money only promises you more money or more variations of it starts Richard Davies’ claim. Davies claims that the value of paper currency isn’t even worth the poor quality paper that it is printed on. The paper currencies worth is in its convenience, “paper currencies that are valuable because they are tools–ways to exchange goods and services,” Davies states. It has nothing to do with the money itself, but what it represents which is a measure of worth for assets. You technically use anything as a means of barter and purchase Davies explains, “Currencies like salt, or coins made from precious metal.” However paper fiat money has established itself as the means of common value.

    Like

  16. zipemup1 says:

    In the book, Money: The True Story of a Made Up Thing, by Jacob Goldstein makes the point that that money is a made up tool that is weird within human relationships.We can infer from his statements that he thinks money’s worth is inflated.

    Like

  17. tarheel1999 says:

    Perhaps the best argument for a societal shift towards cryptocurrency comes from New York Times writer Richard Davies. In his review of Jacob Goldstein’s Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, Davies describes fiat currency as “an i.o.u. . . . that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” The endless cycle of printing, printing, and even more printing of such i.o.u.s based only on a flimsy foundation of faith can only eventually lead to ruin.

    Like

  18. ziggy026 says:

    Jacob Goldstein’s Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing covers how the value of currency has changed throughout our history of dealing with it. In his review of this text, Richard Davies states, “Of all the inventions we rely on to get through the day, nothing is as strange as money.” He expands upon this by stating that today’s currency is a “paradox” and made more sense when currency was goods, materials, and services rather than a cheap material.

    Like

  19. thatwonguyy says:

    Richard Davies wrote a review on Jacob’s Goldstein’s Money: The True Story of a Made Up Thing. He describes money as being a trick, “an I.O.U. printed on cheap material.” His statement makes us believe that money ruined people’s relationships and lives.

    Like

  20. chickendinner says:

    In Jacob Goldstein’s book Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, it is argued that far from being completely divorced from human subjectivity, money is in fact a sort of common social illusion. Describing it as a “shared fiction” which is “unalterably social,” Goldstein posits that its value is entirely attributed to it by its users, in relation to the goods and services it can purchase.

    Like

  21. strawberryfields4 says:

    In Money: The True Story of a Made Up Thing, Jacob Goldstein reflects on how money, something that “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships” has ultimately become one of the most social aspects of our society. In his book review of Money, Richard Davies analyzes how modern technology, such as cryptocurrency, will impact the future of money and its role in society.

    Like

  22. calamariii says:

    In Richard Davies article The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round, he discusses the change that money has had over its history. Davies states that “early chronicles of cash show how societies move from monies with intrinsic value,” which was followed by money changing into “ways to exchange goods and services” made from cheap material that is backed by trust and the promise to receive something for this paper currency at a later date.

    Like

  23. imaspookyghost says:

    In Richard Davies’ review on Jacob Goldstein’s “Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing,” Davies found it strange “how societies move from monies with intrinsic value… to paper currencies that are valuable because they are tools,” such that they are used only for trade. The idea that people trade pieces of printed paper for goods and services seems ridiculous.

    Like

  24. sunshinegirl457 says:

    There is no doubt that the value of money has shifted over time and will continue to shift for centuries to come. Richard Davies expands on this idea in his book review of Jacob Goldstein’s Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing. He is aware that in early human civilizations money was items that had actual value like food or gems, and now it is simply a piece of paper with a hypothetical value. Davies even goes as far to say that money is printed on cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money. This is a why he refers to the concept of money as a paradox because it controls our lives while simultaneously having no real value.

    Like

  25. Lily4Pres says:

    The concept of currency is a “made-up thing, a shared fiction,” according to Jacob Goldstein, author of Money: The True Story of a Made Up Thing. The worth of items has become ambiguous with the introduction of currency; rather than a true worth, items are given a numeric value in currency. While the foundation around money can be seen as very flimsy, Richard Davies, the reviewer of Goldstein’s book, believes currency is “foundational yet resting on faith.” Worth can fluctuate constantly due to this characteristic of currency.

    Like

  26. comatosefox says:

    In Money: The True Story of a Made Up Thing, Jacob Goldstein explains the evolution of currency, how we have gone from using “commodity currencies like salt, or coins made from precious metal,” to flimsy pieces paper. Both have some value worthy of trading, but we have gone from using everyday items to paper which is the only thing that can be traded to get something of actual value.

    Like

  27. frogs02 says:

    In Richard Davies’ book review on Jacob Goldstein’s, Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing, it is mentioned that money is a strange thing. Money helps the world function but Goldstein insists that money “seems cold and mathematical and outside the realm of fuzzy human relationships.” Davies states that money is just an “i.o.u. printed on cheap material.” Money holds no value; it is just a way to exchange goods and what is valued.

    Like

  28. kilotoon says:

    In Jacob Goldstein’s “Money: The True Story of a Made Up Thing”, he elaborates how money is essentially useless without the social construct molded around it. Richard Davies made it clear that money and the topic of modern currency is foundational yet resting on faith”. Goldstein asserts that it’s not the intrinsic value, or the lack thereof, of modern day currency, but the foundation that money is made to be used as a tool to purchase goods and services.

    Like

  29. krackintheneck says:

    In the book review “The Fiction That Makes the World Go Round,” Richard Davies claims that money is a “cheap material that promises the holder nothing but more paper money.” Showing that money has such a big value, but is used on one of the cheapest things possible. Money might as well not be a tangible object.

    Like

  30. nugget114 says:

    The idea of a societal shift towards cryptocurrency over paper currency may be best depicted in a New York Times book review. Writer Richard Davies took it upon himself to review Jacob Goldstein’s Money: The Story of a Made-Up Thing, where Davies notes Goldsteins point of money being a “made up thing” and that it is “unalterably social.” Davies says the central theme of Goldstein’s work is, “The evolving paradox of modern currency — foundational yet resting on faith.” The thought as a whole is concluded by Davies noting that money is nothing more than a “way to exchange goods and services”

    Like

  31. RowanAnnouncer says:

    In the book Money:The True Story of a Made up thing, Jacob Goldstein, eloquently argues that money is “a made up thing” and “fundamentally, unalterably social,” thus cementing how worthless money is without someone telling you that is has value.

    Like

  32. In Jacob Goldstein’s book, Money, he makes you think about money from a different perspective. Goldstein describes money as “a made-up thing, a shared fiction.” He discusses the idea that just a “way to exchange goods,” not serving any real purpose.

    Like

  33. jonnyb25 says:

    In the book “Money: The true story of a made up thing.” Richard Davies describes how money is a “shared fiction” that changes as time goes on. Throughout the chronicle times the base of currency has always rested on the fate of faith, hoping some worthless piece of printed paper continues to work in many ways.

    Like

  34. zeek says:

    In the book, Money, the true story of a made up thing, Jacob Goldstein says “money is fundamentally, unalterably social.” Meaning that money no longer relies on intrinsic values such as bartering for/with goods or silver certificates. Goldstein goes on to say that money today is mainly used as a tool for bartering and services, stating that “paper currencies that are valuable because they are tools for bartering.”

    Like

  35. disneylover2002 says:

    In the book Money: The True Story of a Made Up Thing, Jacob Goldstein writes about how money is “a made-up thing, a shared fiction.” He goes on to explain why money is unnatural and how it causes problems between people.

    Like

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