22 Class TUE NOV 16

Riddle

Rebuttal Unit

For the sake of practice, let’s assume you are strongly in favor of nuclear power as an alternative to burning fossil fuels. Nuclear doesn’t burn petroleum, coal, or natural gas. It doesn’t emit carbon dioxide or methane. It is, by comparison to many alternatives, a clean and sustainable fuel for producing electricity. You’re writing a paper to promote new investment in nuclear power plants.

In your research, you run across an article by Bob Herbert in the New York Times that concerns you. Herbert sounds pretty knowledgeable, and you know he speaks compellingly for opponents of nuclear power in the US. How can you USE HIS ARTICLE in your Rebuttal Argument?

Does he make mistakes of logic? Does he apply his evidence inappropriately? Does he complain of cost overruns that don’t actually result in overly expensive power? Does he concentrate on one or two objections and ignore all the advantages of nuclear power? Does he set up a false choice between two options when there are other alternatives?

Read the article now:

If you subscribe to the digital version of the New York Times:

If you don’t subscribe to the New York Times, here’s the naked text:

Is Nuclear Power Worth the Risk?

When you finish, click through to the Rebuttal post.


31 Responses to 22 Class TUE NOV 16

  1. Lunaduna says:

    Riddle about Fate
    – Someone else had to suffer for me to become a better person (Is horrible)
    – There has to be a cause to this…but nobody knows it yet (Who’s at fault?)

    Rebuttal Unit
    – How to use a counterargument to your advantage? (Find the mistakes – makes the argument a lot less credible)

    – Insufficient Evidence Rebuttal: people will say that nothing will convince them to the opposite side of the argument. (This is not a rebuttal.) You need to show your evidence that is better than the original author’s.
    – Irrelevant Evidence Rebuttal: the evidence has nothing to do with the argument.
    – Inconclusive Evidence Rebuttal: the evidence does not add up to the proof for the argument.
    – Stacking the Deck Rebuttal: ignores the obvious evidence for the opposite side.
    – False Analogy Rebuttal: saying that two things will be alike in one way, but in reality, they are different in another. (Recognizing what the argument is, but has evidence to explain the difference between the two.)
    – False Choice Rebuttal: (Happens after a false analogy) Recognize a third choice, not just a black and white scenario.

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  2. levixvice says:

    11/16/2021- Class Notes
    “Everything happens for a reason” the belief is any force of nature is at play or is an incident of actions of the people causing the consequences to change.
    Rebuttal arguments necessitate appropriate, credible evidence and credible logic that must be scanned for any flawed ideas from another argument with a different point of view that can be used in a counterpoint argument. To determine whether the evidence can be used for a different resolution or interpreted away from the person’s argument without complaints. Always look for the authors’ insufficient, irrelevant, and inconclusive evidence that proves this argument is untrustworthy for public consumption. The author would neglect the other benefits other than the first one through suppression or “stacking the cards.” False analogies must be scanned for any differences that the author reconstructed for his or her own viewpoint rather than pointing out what would be flawed in their argument. False choices would be considered an additional option not presented in the author’s argument for two reasons: it would be credible for the author to be logically sound.

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    • davidbdale says:

      Your work has a unique sound, Levix. I appreciate that you don’t quote. You rephrase, paraphrase, create new language to demonstrate you’re thinking about the material, not merely copying it.
      4/3

      Like

  3. ilovedunkinoverstarbucks says:

    Riddle:
    -Everything happens for a reason
    -Belief in fate?
    -I myself fully believe in fate and the saying everything happens for a reason but I would never use it as an excuse like the people do in the exercise
    Rebuttal:
    -Insufficient evidence rebuttal
    -It is not an effective rebuttal to request more evidence from the author
    -If the author offers insufficient evidence or no evidence at all then one good piece of evidence of your own for an opposing view they can easily refuse it
    -It can provide that good evidence is an effective rebuttal
    -Irrelevant evidence rebuttal
    -It is not effective to complain that you really don’t see what the evidence provided has to do with an argument
    -If the author offers irrelevant evidence logic should tel you what the evidence does/could prove
    -It is good at pointing out that evidence supports a different conclusion than the author is an effective rebuttal
    -Inconclusive evidence rebuttal
    -It is not an effective rebuttal to say that evidence provided doesn’t add up to a proof
    -If the author offers substantial evidence that does not actually support the argument then you should be able to identify the logical fallacy at fault
    -Demonstrating how a correct interpretation of the evidence proves something other than the author’s argument is an effective rebuttal
    -Stacking the deck
    -It is not an effective rebuttal to say the author is unfair to your side of the argument if you do not offer evidence
    -False analogy
    -Prediction based on close comparisons
    -False choice
    -Once a false analogy is made almost certainly a false choice will follow
    -Point out the unnamed third choice

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  4. littlecow24 says:

    -What is the real definition of the belief in fate?
    – “Everything happens for a reason”

    -What to do when coming across a logical article that is not going to help your argument? (The opposite opinion; we are for nuclear plants, article is against)
    -How to use an opposing article to your advantage
    -Everyone makes mistakes in their arguments. Find those points and point them out in a logical and responsible way.
    -Knocking down someone who is knowledgeable is going to be much more compelling in your own argument than knocking down a random
    -Insufficient Evidence Rebuttal: no amount of evidence will change your mind, the person just won’t accept any type of evidence to sway to the other point of view. This is not a good rebuttal/it’s not a rebuttal at all. PROVIDE the evidence that helps your argument if the author does not provide enough evidence. This is a good rebuttal.
    -Irrelevant Evidence Rebuttal: it is not effective to complain about how the evidence provided is irrelevant. Point out that the evidence supports a different conclusion than the author’s is a good rebuttal.
    -Inconclusive Evidence Rebuttal: it is not effective to say the evidence doesn’t add up to a proof. Demonstrate how a correct interpretation of the evidence provided proves something other than the author’s argument is effective.
    -Stacking the Deck Rebuttal: it is not effective to just say that the author is being unfair to your “side” and should offer evidence to support your position. Point out that the author ignores your evidence and give specific evidence to support that. The author talks about a benefit (or disadvantage) for the other position as if it’s the only one but “He neglects to mention…”
    -False Analogy Rebuttal: Important to point out that there are good/bad analogies. A good rebuttal points out the essential difference that keeps (ex.) the 3rd matrix from repeating the first 2 movies or the difference of where a nuclear power plant is placed in different countries
    -False Choice Rebuttal: usually follows a false analogy. 2 bad offers can show false choices, when there is most likely a 3rd choice. Point out the unnamed third choice that is the much better choice than the false solutions presented.

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  5. kingofcamp says:

    English Comp II Lecture Notes (11.16.21)
    Riddle About Fate
    o task (due 11.16.21)
    o “Everything happens for a reason”
    o news flash, it doesn’t
    o people use the phrase for a number or inadequate reasons
    Rebuttal Unit
    o task (due 11.18.2)
    o What happens when someone makes a credible, logical argument?
    o look for the few mistakes in the argument
    o take those mistakes and run with it (reasonably, logically, humbly)
    o rebuttal practice
    o a closer look into a reasonable argument and how to counteract that logical argument
    o “I am right and you are wrong”
    o terrible, that logic does not solve anything
    o insufficient evidence rebuttal
    o opponent shows their evidence and you show your evidence (which is better)
    o irrelevant evidence rebuttal
    o “If the author offers irrelevant evidence, logic should tell you what the evidence does prove, or could prove.”
     use logic to rebuttal your opponent, e.g. “nuclear power is expensive”
    • yes, nuclear power is expensive but so is most sources of power
    o inconclusive evidence rebuttal
    o “If the author offers substantial evidence that doesn’t actually support the argument though, as Bob Herbert does in A Price Too High?, you should be able to identify the logical fallacy at fault.”
    o stacking the deck rebuttal
    o “…if the author clearly (but usually stealthily) “stacks the deck” by suppressing evidence, as Rob Herbert does in A Price Too High?, you should be able to call him on it easily.”
     he IGNORES alternative evidence
     calling him out is not enough
     call him out and provide evidence then accuse him of suppressing evidence
    o false analogy rebuttal
    o “an effective rebuttal of a false analogy is one that points out the essential difference that keeps the third Matrix from repeating the first two movies, or in this case, the essential difference between Japanese nuclear plants and US plants.”
    o false choice rebuttal

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  6. zzbrd2822 says:

    In class today, we first discussed a riddle about fate. We looked at several examples of situations where the phrase “Everything happens for a reason” is used. We then identified which statements were expressions of a belief in fate. We then discussed different Rebuttal Techniques that will help you refute the opposing side’s claim. Some techniques include Insufficient Evidence Rebuttal, Irrelevant Evidence Rebuttal, Inconclusive Evidence Rebuttal, Stacking the Deck Rebuttal, False Analogy Rebuttal, and False Choice Rebuttal. Providing good evidence and pointing out that the evidence supports a different conclusion are examples of effective rebuttals. An effective rebuttal of a false analogy is one that points out the essential differences of two things in comparison. An effective rebuttal of a false choice is one that points out the unnamed third choice. We lastly examined an article that opposes nuclear power as an alternative to burning fossil fuels.

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  7. friendoftacos says:

    For the rebuttal argument we choose something to refute that is a worthy opponent. In a rebuttal argument, there can be an insufficient evidence rebuttal. This rebuttal needs to have good evidence to be an effective rebuttal. Another kind of rebuttal argument is the irrelevant evidence rebuttal. The irrelevant evidence rebuttal is not an effective rebuttal because the evidence that is provided has nothing to do with the argument. An inconclusive evidence rebuttal is another kind of rebuttal argument that is not an effective rebuttal. This rebuttal is not effective because the evidence provided doesn’t quite add up to further the argument. Stacking the deck rebuttal is to claim that the author ignores your side of the argument. In this rebuttal, it is important to offer evidence to support your own argument. A false analogy rebuttal is making a close comparison. From arguments of others, authors may offer the reader false choices in their arguments. A false choice rebuttal will offer two choices that are false and frame an argument without the view of a third choice. An effective rebuttal points out the third choice that is not pointed out in the opponent’s argument.

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    • davidbdale says:

      I think you don’t quite understand, Tacos.
      You can definitely make an effective Irrelevant Evidence Rebuttal. And an effective Insufficient Evidence Rebuttal. But pointing out that the OTHER author’s evidence is insufficient or is irrelevant IS NOT A SUFFICIENT OR EFFECTIVE REBUTTAL. Read the little sections again to see WHAT IS an effective rebuttal in those cases.
      3/3

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  8. gingerbreadman27 says:

    To begin class we discussed a riddle of fate that everything happens for a reason and the many different claims that can be meant from the same phrase. Next we discussed a rebuttal argument and how to exploit the flaws in their argument to bolster our own argument.

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  9. Lily4Pres says:

    Riddle of Fate
    Started of class with a few scenarios and whether or not the phrase “everything happens for a reason” applies in a sense of fate or something else.
    Rebuttal Unit
    Finding a credible person who opposes your view is ‘gold.’ There’s no point in refuting someone who is not credible, you want to take down someone who has worth. Your refutation will have more value when it is destroying an intelligent person’s position. You do this by finding flaws in their argument. One hole will lead to more. Its good to have evidence on your side, but it is better to have a refutation on your side.
    Insufficient evidence rebuttal: If you believe that there is insufficient evidence, don’t point out that there is insufficient evidence. Rather, providing the correct evidence is a good rebuttal.
    Irrelevant evidence: If you believe there is evidence that doesn’t really correlate to their conclusion, do not point that out. Rather, explain the conclusion(s) that the irrelevant evidence is pointing towards.
    Inconclusive evidence: If there is good evidence that does not have a clear conclusion, there is a logical fallacy at hand. Using the correct interpretation of the evidence is a solid rebuttal.
    Stacking the Deck: It’s not effective to say the author is unfair to your side of the argument. Rather, introduce your evidence that the author ignored and argue that evidence’s importance.
    False Analogy: When using false analogies to make a prediction there is some sort of hole apparent in the argument. Such as comparing the unpredictable nuclear disaster at Fukushima with the BP oil spill is not comparable just because they were both unimaginable. The situations being unpredictable did not cause them to occur. Pointing out the essential differences between the differences in a false analogy is more than a solid rebuttal.
    False Choice: Typically directly following the false analogy will be a false choice. The false choice will give the audience two bad options or one decent option with a terrible option. An effective rebuttal of a false choice is to point out the third unnamed choice that is the good choice.

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  10. ziggy026 says:

    The opinion of your refutation argument is wrong. Reliable as it sounds, credible as the author is, it’s wrong. You have the right opinion, but you have to address the point of view of the person who radically disagrees with you by finding flaws in the argument or evidence. When we invite in the smartest person we can find and successfully finds flaws in their argument that reportedly refuted your own, you become the smartest person. Once a false analogy has been made there will be a false choice. Which terrible choice do we make when there is no other alternative? We can’t dispute the possible value by saying there might be unknown risks.

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  11. “Everything happens for a reason”
    Does that quote indicate a belief in fate?
    Rebuttal Unit
    Invite smartest person who disagrees with you into the argument
    Address point of view of the person who radically disagrees with you by finding flaws in their evidence
    When you want to claim that the author disagreeing with you does not have enough evidence, be sure that you have stronger evidence
    Show that their evidence is irrelevant
    Point out things that the author neglected

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  12. frogs02 says:

    Today in class we first started talking about fate. We talked about whether or not some statements were a belief of fate or not. The rebuttal unit can use counterarguments for your own advantage. You have to address the point of view of the person who disagrees with you. The insufficient evidence rebuttal is to point out that the evidence supports a different conclusion than the authors. Demonstrating how a correct interpretation of the evidence proves something other than the author’s argument is an effective rebuttal. An effective rebuttal of a false choice is one that points out the unnamed third choice, in this case, that every new nuclear plant either be built to address all known risks or not be built at all. The analogy is a prediction based on close comparisons. An effective rebuttal points out the third choice. We should not use the second person in the rebuttal argument.

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  13. sunshinegirl457 says:

    The term “everything happens for a reason” is a belief in fate, but not all the time. Depending on the context of a phrase, the meaning can change.
    The rebuttal argument- the person you are afraid of who radically disagrees with you is actually a goldmine. This person gives you opportunities to shut down the doubts in your argument.
    When playing poker, you have to have a higher card than your opponent if no on has any pairs, straights, etc. The same goes for a rebuttal argument, all you need is evidence that’s a little stronger than the opponent’s.
    It’s good to point out false analogies. After the rebuttal argument lesson, we went over some basic grammar fails to finish up the day.

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  14. strawberryfields4 says:

    Rebuttal Argument
    -For the credible person who has a reasonable and compelling argument that contradicts or even opposes your own
    -Invite them in, so you can kill them up close
    -When you refute this educated person, your refutation has more value
    -You have to address this point of view by finding flaws in their argument or evidence
    -Successfully refuting this opponent forces those who rely on this person as their evidence to search for a new perspective
    -When you are ignorant to the obvious objections to your argument, you lose credibility
    -Search for your opponent’s mistakes of logic, irrelevant evidence, insufficient evidence, or inconclusive evidence-all ways to refute your opponent
    -Be aware of “stacking the deck,” which is a technique where the author stealthily only offers evidence that supports their point of view, while suppressing valuable evidence that contradicts your own point of view
    -It is not effective to simply say that your opponent’s position is “unfair”
    -A false analogy rebuttal can discredit your opponent’s entire position
    -A false choice will follow a false analogy

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  15. toastedflatbread22 says:

    -What do we mean by “Everything happens for a reason”?
    -It could just be a way to say that fate is at play
    -It could also be a way to say that the gods control life
    -It can also hold hidden meanings of gratitude, grief, etc.
    -We say this to typically cover how we really feel or put words to our inexplainable emotions
    Rebuttle
    -Find a credible source of counter arguments
    -How do you use totally logical counter-arguments to YOUR advantage?
    -Find the logical fallacies in the argument and it will help you sound more credible
    Insufficient Evidence Rebuttle
    -It does no good to claim that the author has not provided you with enough evidence
    -However, it IS a good rebuttal to provide the evidence for your own argument
    Irrelevant Evidence Rebuttle
    -It is not an effective argument to complain that the author’s evidence is irrelevant
    -However, it IS effective to explain that their evidence supports a different conclusion than the author’s
    Inconclusive Edvidence Rebuttle
    -It is not effective to say that the evidence does not add up to the the proof
    -It IS effective to prove that evidence proves something other than the claim
    Stacking the Deck Rebuttle
    -It is useless to complain that the author is unfair to your side
    -It is smart to state that the author suppresses evidence in order to make themself look better
    -Also point out the evidence that they miss
    False Analogy Rebuttle
    -It is not enough to plainly point out false analogies
    -It is incredibly important to point out false analogies and recognize the difference between it and other analogies
    False Choice Rebuttle
    -Point out the points that the author fails to make

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  16. kilotoon says:

    Class Today:
    Riddle about fate
    Everything happens for a reason activity
    Discussed rebuttal techniques such as insufficient evidence rebuttal, irrelevant evidence rebuttal, inconclusive evidence rebuttal, etc.
    Examined an article that opposes nuclear power as another option instead of burning fossil fuels

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