17 Class THU OCT 28

17 Class THU OCT 28

Wake Up

Card Trick Snippet

Lecture/Demo

By the End of the Day

  1. Start a post titled “Causal—Username.” and another titled “Causal Rewrite—Username.”
  2. If you’re ready to start an actual Causal Argument, use this class time to begin the actual process in the “Causal—Username” post.
  3. If you’re not ready to start writing for real, address your Professor in the first sentence, “I could use some help getting started, Professor.” Something like that.
  4. “Here’s what I have so far,” you might continue, “Since I’m researching the connection between actual crime and crime statistics, I think the cause-and-effect relationship is crucial to my thesis. We THINK that when more crime is committed, the CRIME RATE will reflect that in higher numbers. But actually, it’s the NUMBER OF CRIMES REPORTED AND LAWS ENFORCED that count in
  5. the statistics. So . . . “
  6. And before you know it, you’ll be writing your causal argument.
  7. Put the post into the Feedback Please category and the Causal Argument category, and publish it by the end of the day.
  8. Tell me specifically what kind of Feedback you want.

Portfolio Task

26 Responses to 17 Class THU OCT 28

  1. levixvice says:

    Our world is completely impossible every day because the outcomes in life aren’t always what they appear to be. Causal arguments can be written in five ways: X causes Y, X causes Y & Z, both X & Y cause Z, X causes Y (which causes Z), and X does not cause Y. People want to know if this topic will occur or if it will occur based on how it is perceived, so causal arguments must include relevant evidence that relates to the main idea of what would or would not cause the outcome to occur.

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  2. zzbrd2822 says:

    In class today, we discussed a card trick and how the chances of shuffling a pack of cards in the same way twice is approximately 8 *1067. Using this logic, you could say that we and our existence is impossible, yet we exist so we should not take life for granted. We then reviewed over types of causal arguments. This includes Single Cause with a Single Effect, Single Cause with Several Effects, Several Causes for a Single Effect, A Causal Chain, and Causation Fallacy. We described different examples of each type of causal argument. You don’t need to prove anything positive of your own to produce a strong causation fallacy argument. You only need to discredit the logic, the methods, or the premises of your opponents who think they have proved causation. We then practiced writing causal argument statements using our own research topic.

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  3. ilovedunkinoverstarbucks says:

    Card trick:
    -Shows us that our existence is impossible and that our everyday outcomes could be something completely different
    Types of causal arguments:
    -Single cause with a single effect
    -Facebook could cost us our jobs
    -Posting a picture to facebook deemed inappropriate by your employer could cause trouble
    -Single cause with several effects
    -Prohibition leads to crime, death, etc.
    -Several causes for one effect
    -Reasons for kids joining gangs
    -Causal chain
    -Failure to prosecute rape causes rape
    -Causation Fallacy
    -Violent games are not the missing link

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  4. lokiofasgard24 says:

    Causal Argument demo
    -address some “x causes y” arguments
    -prove your argument
    -possibly begin a causal chain (x causes y which causes z….)
    -expose what would break a causal chain
    -causal fallacy, disprove that x causes y

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  5. kingofcamp says:

    English Comp II Lecture (10.28.21)
    Beginning—Warm Up
    • “World’s Simplest Card Trick”
    o 7 shuffles to randomize the deck
    o beating the odds
    o “we are impossible”
     everything that happens is beating odds, constantly
     don’t take the world for granted
    • The invention of chess
    o the Shah of Persia challenged the brightest to a game of chess
     luck vs. intelligence
    Mini Lecture
    • We are all descendants from a common people
    Lecture
    • Types of claims
    * the causal argument needs to be specific (for all arguments)*
    o single cause with a single effect (X causes Y)
     quite rare
    o single cause with several effects (X causes Y and Z)
    o several causes with a single effect (both X and Y causes Z)
    o a casual chain (X causes Y, which causes Z)
     domino effect
    o causation fallacy (X does not cause Y)
    In-class exercise
    (X causes Y) Men having more power than women causes misogynic behavior.
    (X causes Y and Z) Men have more power than women which causes misogynic attitudes and the objectification of women’s virginity.
    (Both X and Y causes Z) Men having more power than women in the patriarchal society and playing authority causes misogynic behaviors.
    (X causes Y, which causes Z) Men historically have held more power than women which causes misogynic behavior which in turn causes women to objectify their own virginity.
    (X does not cause Y) Men having overall authority in the patriarchal society does not cause women to objectify their own virginity.

    Portfolio Task
    • Casual Argument (11.4.21)
    • By the end of the day (today—10.28.21)
    o make a post titled “causal—username” and another titled “causal rewrite—username”

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  6. gingerbreadman27 says:

    To start class off we discussed a simple card trick to look at how simple things like existing have such an astronomically small chance of happening and you shouldn’t take that for granted. Next we took a look at causal arguments and different examples of them. Then we completed a small in class assignment to develop causal arguments using our own research. Then finally we took a look at a draft causal argument that stated that 9/11 caused America to become more racist

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  7. friendoftacos says:

    In a causal argument, there is possible to have a single cause with a single effect. There are things you can say for this type of causal argument, but most may not be relevant to your argument. A causal argument can also have a single cause with several effects or a several causes with a single effect. A causal chain is another type of causal argument. In a causal chain, one thing causes a reaction to and that continues to cause another thing to happen and so on. The last approach to a causal argument is the causation fallacy, which argues that one thing does not cause another thing to happen.

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  8. minutemen14 says:

    Card Trick
    -The chances of us being here are slim to none
    -This puts things into perspective to cherish every moment
    -The odds are outrageous AGAINST things happening, so appreciate the fact that they did.

    Types of Causal Arguments
    Single Cause (Single Effect) – that a situation’s outcome was caused by one factor only (X and Y)
    Single Cause (Several Effects) [ X, Y, and Z ] – One outcome is due to many factors
    Several Cause (Single Effect)- Many reasons for one outcome
    Causal Chain (X causes Y, which Cause Z)- One factor causes an outcome and the outcome causes another effect. “Failure to prosecute rape, causes rape”. Clear that there are no consequences which not only does not stop rapes, but promotes them since they have not been punishable.

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  9. Lunaduna says:

    Card Trick
    This demo described that no matter how many times you shuffle the deck, most likely you will never have the same sequence.
    – The impossible happens every day, we are impossible
    – Never take life for granted

    Causal Arguments
    – You can ask for specific recommendations for your essay (To get a handle on what you are arguing)

    Types of casual arguments
    There can be a lot of reactions to the one premise, but it may not be 100%
    – Single cause with a single effect (X causes Y)
    – Single cause with multiple effects (X causes Y and Z)
    – Multiple causes with a single effect (X and Y cause Z)
    – A casual chain (X causes Y, which causes Z…)
    – Causation Fallacy (X does not cause Y)

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  10. Lily4Pres says:

    Card Trick:
    If you correctly shuffle a deck of cards, it’s virtually impossible to place those 52 cards down in whatever order you place them down in. However, we can still accomplish this feat over and over and over again. It is 1 in 52! to shuffle a deck in any order. Be alert to impossible things that occur all the time; we are impossible.
    Causal Argument:
    Types of Causal Claims:
    Single cause with a single effect (X causes Y): When writing a cause and effect argument, make sure to stay locked-in and focused. Straying away from going off topic and talking about irrelevant nonsense.
    Single cause with several effects (X causes Y and Z):

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  11. littlecow24 says:

    -The odds against things happening that happen everyday are almost ridiculously impossible; the odds against laying out 52 cards in a specific order is 8×10^67 because any order of cards after being shuffled around 7 times will be different from the next order

    -When writing our causal arguments, we can ask for recommendations
    Types of Causal Arguments
    – single cause with single effect (x causes y) : whether its ethical or moral should not come up in your causal argument
    – single cause with several effects (x causes y and z) : don’t bring up another cause in your argument
    – several causes for a single effect (both x and y cause z) : you can dispute the fact that a topic has a “known” cause and effect, saying there are several causes
    – a causal chain (x causes y, which causes z) : there can be a topic that also has z causing x, creating a circular pattern
    – causation fallacy (x does not cause y) : arguing against x causing y, which is what is normally perceived

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  12. frogs02 says:

    Notes 10/28
    Today we first started talking about a card trick and how the chances of shuffling a pack of cards in the same way twice will most likely never happen. The impossible happens every day, we are impossible. We then talked about the different types of causal arguments. Single Cause with a Single Effect (X causes Y). Single Cause with Several Effects (X causes Y and Z).Several Causes for a Single Effect (Both X and Y cause Z).A Causal Chain (X causes Y, which causes Z). Causation Fallacy (X does not cause Y). We then critiqued a causal draft because none of the claims were supported. We should not do that. In a causal argument, we need to make it clear what the cause and effect are for each argument. We need to put our causal argument into the causal argument folder AND the causal rewrite argument folder.

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  13. World’s simplest card trick
    Everyday impossible things happen, we are impossible and shouldn’t be taken for granted

    Causal Argument
    Single cause with a single effect
    Single cause with several effects
    Could be several causes for a single effect
    Causal chain X causes Y which causes Z
    Causation Fallacy X does not cause Y

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  14. ziggy026 says:

    Objection is irrelevant to the causal argument

    Burden of proof is on you

    Careful what you choose as subject matter and what you choose to site

    In definition argument, spell out the parameters of what a study looks like that would actually proves hypothesis. How test subjects are chosen, how much exposure included in study, real life demonstrations

    Even if you don’t prove anything positive of your own you can discredit opponents who think they have proved causation, either way you’ve made a valuable contribution to the conversation

    Question the methodology of the supposed proof

    Types of causal arguments
    X causes Y
    X causes Y and Z
    Both X and Y causes Z
    X causes Y which causes Z
    X does not cause Y

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  15. sunshinegirl457 says:

    The wake up exercise was very interesting because it showed how we do impossible things all the time without even realizing it.
    Causal argument- An single cause can have several effects. There might be different standards for a kindergarten teacher and an insurance company employee. Just like with the Challenger exploded, there was more than one reason why it happened. For the gang examples, it’s pointless to discuss what happens within the gangs because the main thing you are trying to prove is why they joined it in the first place.
    We left replies for 5 different types of cause and effect arguments for our own topics. This got me thinking about the assignment due next week which was helpful.
    Portfolio ask due November 4th at 11:59
    Don’t find yourself favor correlation over causation, i.e. “breakfast causes lunch”. While it is chronologically before lunch, that doesn’t mean there can’t be a lunch without a breakfast.

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  16. calamariii says:

    The odds of laying down a deck of cards in a specific order are nearly infinitely high, and everyday things with astronomical odds happen. Within the coming weeks, much of our portfolio work should be done, and having the bulk of writing out of the way before going into the holiday is a good way of not stressing over it when it may be difficult to complete the work. Avoid irrelevant ideas when writing a cause-and-effect argument and avoid off-topic arguments that lose the focus of the original argument. While some arguments may seem like they are related to what you are writing in your cause and effect argument, not all of them will be necessary to talk about. When choosing the causal argument, consider how many causes and effects there are in the argument as the number of them will change which causal argument you are making. The same topic can also be used in a number of causal arguments based on how you look at that topic and the cause and effects it can encapsulate. Just because an event follows another event, doesn’t mean that it is a cause and effect, the two events may just be related.

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  17. strawberryfields4 says:

    Card Trick
    -Everything we do is nearly impossible
    -Do not take yourself or your achievements for granted

    Causal Arguments
    -Personal views and objections are irrelevant to the cause and effect of an argument
    -Maintain focus and do not get distracted by things irrelevant to the actual causation
    -Not every cause has a single effect and not every effect has a single cause
    -Moral judgement is irrelevant
    -Avoid shortcuts and be specific
    -Nobody has proved that X causes Y can be just as effective (disproving)
    -Look for persuasive, probable causes, not proof

    Types of Causal Arguments
    -Single cause with single effect (X causes Y)
    -Single cause with several effects (X causes Y and Z)
    -Several causes for a single effect (Both X and Y cause Z)
    -A causal chain (X causes Y, which causes Z)
    -Causation Fallacy (X does not cause Y)

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  18. comatosefox says:

    started with a card trick, I don’t know if Id really call it that, but it is what it is.
    We talked about the man that tricked the king with a chess board and rice, where it multiples each square.
    We talk about the causal argument and how to go about actually defending and writing it. Only write about what is relevant, not your ideas or morals. If facebook is taking jobs away, don’t bitch about it taking your job, talk about how only some companies have stricter regulations when it come to social media. What causes it, why?
    Discussed the argument due next week

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  19. Lily4Pres says:

    Card Trick:
    If you correctly shuffle a deck of cards, it’s virtually impossible to place those 52 cards down in whatever order you place them down in. However, we can still accomplish this feat over and over and over again. It is 1 in 52! to shuffle a deck in any order. Be alert to impossible things that occur all the time; we are impossible.
    Causal Argument:
    When writing a cause and effect argument, make sure to stay locked-in and focused. Straying away from going off topic and talking about irrelevant nonsense.
    Types of Causal Claims:
    Single cause with single effect (X causes Y)
    Single cause with several effects (X causes Y and Z)
    Several causes for a single effect (Both X and Y cause Z)
    Causal chain (X causes Y, which causes Z)
    Causation fallacy (X does not cause Y/Nobody has properly proved that X has caused Y)
    Other complications: Considering how many causes it takes to achieve any result, you’re not responsible to prove your argument as a guarantee. A probable cause, with evidence and reason is enough.

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  20. RowanAnnouncer says:

    firstly, we overlooked a demonstration about the world’s simplest card trick. not only is it the simplest, but it’s the most unlikely trick. randomly shuffling the cards, then laying them out next to each other is most unlikely-to-be-replicated event ever. we then spoke about our upcoming causal argument assignment. we looked at many examples of a causal argument to establish a good argument. in the attempt to create a good causal argument you must focus on the cause and effect without dedicating any time to themes that fall outside the task at hand. we continued by defining different types of causal arguments with examples and formats to visualize each definition.

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  21. zipemup1 says:

    We reviewed a card trick in class today, and how the chances of shuffling a deck of cards in the same way again are around 8 *1067. Using this reasoning, we and our existence are impossible, but we exist, thus we should not take life for granted. We next went over many forms of causal reasoning.

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  22. toastedflatbread22 says:

    Wake Up
    -The world is constantly beating the odds and we are always achieving the seemingly impossible
    -This idea was shown through the cards that Mr. Hodges layed out in a very unique order
    -It is insane to think about how big the odds are of many life occurrences, for example, how all have ancestors that are probably in some way related
    Causal Arguments
    -There are different types of causal arguments, for example:
    -Single cause (X causesY): Stating that one thing causes one other thing
    -Questioning ethical or morality is not related to these arguments, it just states the facts
    -Single cause with several effects (X causes Y and Z): States that one thing causes another but also causes the outcomes of the first issue
    -Several causes for a single effect (both X and Y cause Z): Often used to refute “common knowledge”-refute the idea that there is only one cause
    -A causal chain (X causes Y, which causes Z): One thing leads to an outcome, which often causes yet another result
    -Causation Fallacy (X does not cause Y): Find evidence that prove something that is not what was previously believed
    -What would you have to do to test this idea?

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  23. chickendinner says:

    Outcomes which, statistically speaking, have an infinitesimally small chance of happening, are still possible and happen every day.
    It’s easy to end up writing a terrible causal essay if you forget your point and wander into useless tangents.
    A causal argument should only be a causal argument, and not head off into discussions of how things should or shouldn’t be.
    There are different types of categorical arguments, (e.g. x causes y, x doesn’t cause y, x causes y causes z) and which one to uses depends on what point you’re making and what evidence you have.

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