16 Class TUE OCT 26

16 Class TUE OCT 26

Wake up


Housekeeping

  • The New Portfolios FA21 Category
  • Your personal Portfolio Category (e.g. Portfolio JohnWick66)
  • Place BOTH your Definition Argument AND your Definition Rewrite into your new personal Portfolio category.

Lecture/Demo/Exercise

Anne Frank

Take Home Task

  • Open Strong—Your Hypothesis
    • DUE THU OCT 28(11:59pm WED OCT 27)
Open Strong

40 Responses to 16 Class TUE OCT 26

  1. Lunaduna says:

    Before starting your definition part of the essay, you may have a paragraph before it stating another definition.

    Voting (For democracy)
    For example: in a population 60% is green and 40% blue (In most cases green would dominate.) Which, does not seem fair.
    Should any legislator side with the 1%? (How does the 1% earn more power? By getting more important votes.)

    Wake Up (Challenger)
    What do you mean by “why?”
    The example with the carriage, just explains the answer why – is because he got run over.
    The challenger explosion was due to the failure of the O-rings (Immediate cause)
    There are a bunch of causes: o-ring failure, the cold weather, the ignorance of NASA, or the pressure of sending a citizen into space.

    The real reason: Roman war chariots
    – Built with wheels spaced 4 feet, 8-1/2 in. apart. (Depended on two horses rear-ends)
    Railroad carts were passed with the same spacing (for the tracks)

    The purpose of a causal argument is to answer questions:
    “Why did this occur?”
    “What is the cause?”
    “What is the effect?”

    How to Open a Lecture
    – How to keep a reader, reading, your work/ (Make them want to read the next sentence.)
    – Chose a good opening sentence: (An argument cannot be won in the first sentence but it can be lost.) (First sentences are very important.)
    – Readers are attracted to a good opening sentence, which intrigues your reader to continue.
    Writers need to be persuasive – being reasonable but firm. (Ethos, Pathos, Logos)

    You can support both sides of an argument (Truth)

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  2. zzbrd2822 says:

    In class today, we first briefly reviewed what you should be defining in a definition argument. We used the example topic of gerrymandering to discuss what should be defined in a definition argument, to provide clarification for when we rewrite our own definition arguments. It can be easy to be distracted by the terms that are right in front of you. We then discussed the explosion of the Challenger and a different ambiguity to questions of “why.” We discussed at what point in a long causal chain do we isolate a single cause and identify it as the explanation for “why” something happened. The common explanation was the failure of O-Rings to contain the immense pressure of combustion within the rocket. The complicated explanation can include the O-rings failing, the design needing a warm temperature at launch, NASA ignoring warnings that the weather was too cold, the decision to send a civilian to space creating pressure to launch, and NASA taking an unprecedented risk. An unlikely explanation would connect the rubber O-Rings and trace them back to Roman war chariots, which were built with wheels spaced out the width of two horses. We then briefly touched on some housekeeping to inform us of the newly created Portfolio categories. Next, we discussed how to write an opening to your essay. Success in arguing depends on persuading readers of the truth of a clearly stated premise. Four important parts include persuasion, truth, clarity, and premise.

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  3. spaghettitacosforthesoul says:

    -the best way to define your opposition to gerrymandering is by defining how democracy works.
    -the challenger is the first American aircraft that exploded with a passenger onboard 90seconds into the flight.
    -Why did the Challenger explode?
    -Donald Barthelme used to write short stories, and they were very simple.
    -he questions why his father die, why did his father die? Leading us to believe that he’s asking a moral question to god. but he answers it by saying his father got run over by a carriage.
    -asking why the challenger exploded, how did it come to be?
    -It was cold in Florida, there was ice on the launchpad. And there were objections to lunching.
    – it exploded because of the failure of o-rings to contain the pressure combustion in the rocket.
    -There’s a chain of causes, the design required warm temperature, civilian to space created pressure to lunch, Nasa wanted to take a risk.

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  4. levixvice says:

    Class Notes-10/26/21
    Definition If the argument is well thought out, it should be a formulaic use of defining the terms with how we think and learn of the topic’s definition. “Why” has more than one meaning for any sentence that begins with “why it happened” as being mundane and never discusses the cause and effect of the purpose of it. Causation is how people can see how something happened from the “why” with several reason to confirm the facts, whether the reasons are long, short, simple, or complicated. The goal of starting a lecture is to compel the reader to learn by using persuasive sentences that are well-structured. “An argument cannot be won in the first sentence, but it can be lost,” is the overall focus for an opening sentence with strong argument between two claims for the reader to be challenged from the explanation and encouraged to be familiar debates to illustrations. To be successful, the formula for an opening sentence must include persuasion (appealing with logic, emotion, and, humanity), truth (state the argument with honest), clarity (be clear from opinions, claims, and sentences), and a premise.

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  5. littlecow24 says:

    -The most obvious term may not be the best term for your definition essay
    -Asking “why” is not a moral question but of what was the cause

    -The Challenger exploded on live tv when taking off; why?
    -Immediate cause was the O-Rings failure. NASA ignored the cold weather, even though that had been a problem for a while (design was for warm temp)
    -In the Roman Empire, the width of 2 horses became the standard for the size of chariots, so both could fit through gateways when horses were leading a chariot
    -The British Empire used this same spacing for railroad cars. America then adopted the spacing too for a standard gauge.
    -Tunnels were then made to exactly fit 2 trains that must pass without hitting the other using the same gauge
    -The components of the rocket travelled from Utah to Florida, and had to travel through the railroad tunnels. They were built in sections and then built together in Florida, adding the O-Rings
    -In conclusion, the Challenger exploded because of that standard gauge the horses involuntarily created

    -Now that there are Portfolio categories, be sure to put portfolio tasks into that category as well as your username and task category

    -You can’t win your argument if your reader quits
    -Keep every sentence compelling them to read the next one
    -Your first sentence should be an argument within itself. It should have a couple claims; your first sentence doesn’t have to be true
    -Truth is not proof; we tell the truth we believe to be true. We won’t lie, we will state our case truthfully

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  6. gingerbreadman27 says:

    To start class off we discussed why the challenger space shuttle exploded. The failure of the O-rings caused the shuttle to explode because it was too cold. We continued to look at the question of “why?” and discussed all the different answer that we could choose to answer that simple question. Next we discussed how to write a good opening. The purpose of every sentence is to keep the reader engaged so you can argue you points and pursued the reader.

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  7. friendoftacos says:

    The question “why” is powerful. The question can have answers that are based upon causes of a problem. A causal argument can provide answers to the question “why did something happen?” In an opening for an argument, the goal of the first sentence is to get the reader to read the next sentence. The same applies to the second sentence, the third sentence, and the rest of the sentences in your argument. In the first sentence, you cannot win an argument, but you can lose the argument. In your argument, it is important to be persuasive. You do not want your readers to be defensive, you want them to be receptive of your argument. Having truth and clarity in your argument is essential to creating success in your argument. Premises also need to be in your argument. Premises cannot be false and they need to have evidence.

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  8. lokiofasgard24 says:

    Why the challenger exploded
    -understand “why”
    -find causation
    -track back to the most original reason for an outcome
    How to open
    -most important job of sentence 1 is to get the reader to read sentence 2 and so on
    -use your sentences in a strategic order to keep your reader going
    -make sure you present from the glass half full pov
    -don’t expose your entire argument in the first sentence
    -be persuasive

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  9. ilovedunkinoverstarbucks says:

    Why the challenger exploded:
    -The day started with cold weather which caused ice to form on the launch pad overnight which was unusual in florida
    -22 degrees fahrenheit and it was known it should not have been launched so it was delayed a few times before decided to follow through with the launch
    -Common explanation
    -Failure of O-rings to contain the immense pressure of combustion within the rocket
    -Complicated issue
    -Failure of o-ring
    -Design required a warm temp at launch
    -NASA ignored the cold weather warnings
    -Decision to send a civilian to space created outside pressure
    -NASA was emboldened by the program’s success to take the risk
    How to open a lecture:
    -It’s all in how you say it
    -An argument can not be won in the first sentence but can be lost
    -What makes a good opening sentence
    -It makes two strong paradoxical claims
    -Sums up a strong argument that the essay will make
    -An argument in itself
    -Challenge for the reader
    -memorable
    -Can be debated, demonstrated, and illustrated
    -Good example of itself
    -Success in arguing depends on persuading readers of the truth of a clearly stated premise
    -Persuasion
    -Truth
    -Clarity
    -Premise
    -Persuasion
    -We will not prove but we will sway our readers in a different direction than they originally believed. We will appeal to their logic, emotions, and humanity
    -Truth
    -Different than proof as we will not be lying we will be speaking the truth
    -Clarity
    -Be clear or you will lose the reader
    -Premise
    -Can not be false or obvious
    -Require evidence and persuasion

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  10. toastedflatbread22 says:

    Definition Argument
    -In the definition argument, it is not very effective to just define the main topic of your paper-define subcategories (if the paper is about Gerrymandering, don’t define Gerrymandering)
    -Instead, write a definition of democracy and illustrate a formula about how you believe democracy should work
    -Establish the situation that you would like to achieve
    Wake Up
    -The question “why” for anything can have many answers-often it’s the moral answer and the actual causal answer
    -Writing a causal argument requires the writer to trace steps back that lead to the cause of an event
    -Even if a statement seems completely outlandish, it may still be a viable
    -It is important to think creatively because you can convince your reader of nearly anything you believe to be true
    How to Open
    -The first sentence needs to engage the reader and keep them interested…so does the second sentence…and the third…and the fourth…
    -Tell the reader your information in a way that will keep them reading-don’t hit them with boring or dull information
    -For example, an opener is good because:
    -Do not worry about proving anything, instead persuade readers by appealing to logos, pathos, and ethos

    It makes two strong paradoxical claims.
    It sums up a very strong argument the essay will make.
    It is itself an argument.
    It makes a challenge to the reader.
    It’s memorable.
    It can be debated, demonstrated, illustrated.
    It’s a good example of itself.
    -State your case truthfully -Speak clearly -Premises cannot be false nor obvious

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    • davidbdale says:

      Very nice, flatbread, although it doesn’t HAVE TO BE the case that you can’t for example, define gerrymandering. But in the illustration I used for class, the thesis is that gerrymandering corrupts democracy. It’s more important to establish what we mean by a functioning and NON-corrupt democracy so we can prove that gerrymandering ruins it. No reader expects to be treated to a definition of democracy, which makes the essay fresh and interesting. Only when we remind ourselves of our ideals can we recognize how far we’ve fallen from achieving them.
      3/3

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  11. frogs02 says:

    notes 10/26
    Today in class we first started talking about how there are different types of questions that can connect to why? Of what was the cause. We then talked about the challenger and why it failed. The O-rings failed, the design required a warm ambient temperature at launch, NASA ignored warnings that the weather was too cold, The decision to send a civilian to space created pressure to launch, and NASA was emboldened by the program’s success to take an unprecedented risk. The new portfolio category is up and when we have 8 assignments in there, that is when the portfolio is full and finished. You need to keep updating and revising the tasks in your portfolio. We then talked about how to open a lecture. There are better ways to get a point across. You want to take the nicer way to not make the reader mad. Engage the reader and get them to read the second sentence. Get them to read the following sentences. If they stop reading, you lose the argument. They need to read the very last sentence. An argument cannot be won in the first sentence, but it can be lost. What is so good about it? It makes two strong paradoxical claims. It sums up a very strong argument the essay will make. It is itself an argument. It makes a challenge to the reader. It’s memorable. It can be debated, demonstrated, illustrated. It’s a good example of itself. We are not going to lie. The four strategies of argumentation are persuasion, truth, clarity, and premise. We lose the argument when we lose sight of the actual fact.

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  12. 10/26 Notes

    Why the Challenger Exploded
    Challenger exploded on live TV- why?
    Failure of O-rings because of the cold- NASA ignored warning
    The question “why” is ambiguous
    Barthelme plays with the two meanings of “why”
    Physical causes or what could we have done to prevent

    Housekeeping
    New Portfolios FA21 category
    Put definition and definition rewrite into category

    How to Open a Lecture
    It’s all about how you say it
    Can you tell the same story in a “nice way”
    Choose a good opening sentence
    An argument cannot be won in the first sentence, but it can be lost
    First sentence should get the reader to want to read the second sentence, and so on- keep them reading so that you don’t lose the argument.
    Persuasion: Persuade readers by being reasonable but firm
    Truth: Different than proof. To be caught in a lie would be destroying credibility
    Clarity: If we can’t be understood, we lose the argument
    Premise: Requires evidence and persuasion

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  13. comatosefox says:

    The challenger exploded because the o rings failed which was due to the cold weather on the day of launch. Which happened because NASA cleared the launch even after evaluating the risk. This is the why.
    If it wasn’t for horses giving the Roman empire making two horses the standard width of roads and trains and tunnels, the o rings on the challenger may not have been needed. Which would have prevented the explosion.
    When writing an opening, engage your reader, get them to read on. You can make it its own argument.

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  14. krackintheneck says:

    What I learned in class today:
    – to have an effective definition argument you must define the subcategories making up your main topic
    – when opening an argument use a unique way to engage your reader by getting your message across by using a way to transition into the main topic
    – a good opening sentence makes two strong paradoxical claims
    – the whole purpose of the opening sentence is to get the reader to read the second sentence and so on
    – you must persuasion, truth, clarity, and premise in your writing
    – we do not need to prove anything in our essays
    – you will lose the argument by dismissing the readers in any way shape or form
    – do not show any sign of bias
    – you will lose the argument if you lie and lose your credibility
    – our claims to persuade must be clear
    – make statements instead of sounding unsure
    – opening sentence should contain an argument in itself that needs to be defined and provide proof
    – in the opening sentences, provide a counterintuitive claim
    – make powerful claims to make the reader continue reading

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    • davidbdale says:

      – a good opening sentence makes two strong paradoxical claims

      I’ve seen this in several Replies now, and it’s my fault. Certainly NOT EVERY first sentence needs to contain two paradoxical claims. The beauty of the first sentence in my illustration (and what made it superior to all the others) was its combination of strong factors, including that it made two strong paradoxical claims.
      Whew.
      3/3

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  15. sunshinegirl457 says:

    Today in class we further discussed the gerrymandering idea to give us more information on how to structure the definition argument. We then went over “why” the challenger exploded. In actuality it was due to the low temperature in Florida that hindered the O-rings from properly working. On the other hand, it can be said that it was due to NASA’s carelessness when considering the safety of the teacher, and wanting to please the people of the world watching along.
    The width of two horses pulling a chariot became a standard in the Roman Empire, and then in the British Empire as train track measurements. America then followed suit and made their trains 4 feet 8.5 inches wide. This is just like the Challenger which was built in Utah in individual parts but assembled on site in Florida. So there are many reasons “why” the Challenger exploded, you just have to trace it far back enough.
    As for housekeeping, there is a new Portfolio FA21 category where posts can be put into for any final portfolio work. There are two possible assignments to be put in there, and once there are 8 the portfolio is complete. For the credit card fee examples of a good opening sentence, it taught me to stay on a lighter note to not scare the readers away. If the opening is too long and negative the audience will not be interested, and the primary job of the first sentence is to get them to read the second sentence and so on and so forth.
    When making an argument you are only allowed to use persuasion. Methods to be used are ethos, pathos, and logos. You can never “prove” anything in writing because people have all different opinions. It is also unacceptable to lie because then you have lost the argument if they get defensive. The only true authority we have is that of our voice, so make sure to make very clear claims. Especially with ambiguous situations- make sure to specify the ambiguity and don’t be wishy washy.
    The marshmallow experiment is a great example of counterintuitive logic and keeping readers engaged while proposing new ideas. There are other examples, too, that show how to make many strong claims in just a few sentences. I can use these examples in my open strong take home task to help me develop a good opening.

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  16. strawberryfields4 says:

    The Challenger Wake Up- Causal Arguments
    -Asking “why” can have different meanings
    -Are you asking the physical causes or “why oh why did this tragedy have to occur?”
    -Where in the causal chain did something go wrong
    -The answer to the question “why?” could be “because of the failure of the O-Rings”
    -It could also be phrased “NASA ignored warnings that the weather was too cold.” This wording clearly places NASA at fault, rather than placing blame on a simple technological failure
    -“The Challenger exploded because of two horses side by side.”
    -In the ancient Roman empire, chariots were designed to be narrower than the horses pulling them. They developed roads with a standard groove size of 4 feet 1/8 inches.
    -When chariots were succeeded by trains, the standard train size became 4 feet 1/8 inches as well.
    -Tunnels were designed to accommodate two passing trains using as little space as possible
    -Because chariots were a certain width and trains were a certain width, then tunnels were a certain width, and so on… all is attributed to the width of two horses’ butts
    -It can all be traced back with a chain of events

    How to Open
    -Play your best card upfront
    -Let your reader know how controversial and bold you want to be, while still taking the right angle
    -Can you tell the same story nicely?
    -Entice the reader to read on
    -Be clear, but stay friendly
    -The purpose of the first sentence is to get the reader to read the second sentence.The purpose of the second sentence is to get the reader to read the third sentence. And so on until the end of your essay.
    -Key concepts of an opening: persuasion, truth, clarity, and premise
    -Avoid being condescending and insulting the reader by using “we” and be inclusive of all
    -You can remain ambiguous without being unclear (your attitude is clear)

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  17. RowanAnnouncer says:

    firstly, we discussed why the challenger exploded. the circumstances of the explosion were explained and the reason the challenger exploded goes all the way back to the roman empire. This demonstration gave me a different perspective on the causes of events. It’s improbable to find one cause for the stand-alone event. There’s always a way to track an event’s cause going back in time to a seemingly unrelated separate event. This demonstration reminds me of the Butterfly Effect. we continued with the demonstration on how to write a good first sentence. the best way to write a first sentence is to make two strong paradoxical claims. you must intrigue the leader to continue reading. Then you must keep the impact going throughout your whole paper to keep the reader intrigued, thus keeping the reader reading. we then discussed the marshmallow argument. this small paragraph encapsulates everything the author is going to accomplish in his essay, in just the first paragraph. we finished the class off with an assignment due tonight and an assignment due Wednesday, along with the visual rhetoric assignment due Wednesday as well.

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    • davidbdale says:

      First of all, RA, I love your Notes.
      But also this:

      the best way to write a first sentence is to make two strong paradoxical claims.

      I’ve seen this in several Replies now, and it’s my fault. Certainly NOT EVERY first sentence needs to contain two paradoxical claims. The beauty of the first sentence in my illustration (and what made it superior to all the others) was its combination of strong factors, including that it made two strong paradoxical claims.
      Whew.
      4/3

      Like

  18. calamariii says:

    When writing or revising the definition argument, making sure the topic you are spending 1000 words on is necessary to have a good definition argument. When asking why something happened, often the reason for the question is to get the moral and some other non-specific answers to the question and often not a blunt simple response on why something has happened. Through a series of connections, you can make a causal argument that the with of horses is responsible for the challenger disaster. Causal arguments can explain why things have happened, even when the connections don’t seem obvious at first. When giving a reader any argument, how you give them the argument may make them accept it or not. Often when information is given in a friendly and non-aggressive way, readers are more likely to hear it out and eventually accept it. The job of the first sentence and every following sentence is to get them to read the next sentence. When writing the premise and beginning an argumentative paper, the argument cannot be won immediately but it can be lost. The premise should be persuasive, hold the truth, and cannot be obvious.

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  19. zipemup1 says:

    In class today, we went through quickly what you should define in a definition argument. We used the example topic of gerrymandering to explain what should be described in a definition argument, to offer clarification for when we rewrite our own definition arguments.

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  20. kingofcamp says:

    I was not physically presented in class today but that does not stop me from taking general notes. From what I have gathered, the class started with a warm-up, per usual. Reading under “What do we mean by ‘Why’,” I understand that Donald Barthelme uses two different “whys” in his short story. As later stated, “the answer he comes up with serves the OTHER meaning of ‘why.'” Below the first section of the warm, there is a video about “Why the Challenger Exploded.” Like the beginning of the warm-up post, there are different types of “whys” mentioned/discussed under this section of the blog.
    Carrying on, there is some general housekeeping which I assume you talked more in depth to the class about. Following the housekeeping, there is a lectured posted. The topic of today’s lecture was “How to Open a Lecture.” The lecture begins with the key words, “It’s all in how you say it.” Following these wise words, an example is provided for further explanation. After the example you follow with, “Choose the Good Opening Sentence” and you proceed to list opening sentences.

    Eventually I come to a section that reads “Start again.” Under this section you say, what I find to be most important, “An argument cannot be won in the first sentence, but it can be lost. Success in arguing depends on persuading readers of the truth of a clearly stated premise.” After this you proceed to break that quote down in four sections (persuasion, truth, clarity, and premise). You later give examples following the breakdown.

    Reaching a conclusion, you end with a take home task, due October 27th, at 11:59pm.

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  21. chickendinner says:

    If you analyze an outcome thoughtfully, you will be able to create a causal claim which is not obvious to the reader.
    The purpose of every sentence in an essay should be to carry the reader’s interest to the sentence.
    The opening of an essay should grab the reader’s attention, without undermining the argument.

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